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I've got the following code which depending on a url parameter changes and then hides a select option on a form. ie www.example.com?type=images

Eventually there will be over 20 different parameters. I'd like to know of a better way than having a huge amount of if elses. Just an outline of how to do it is fine, I'm new to this, so I'd like to be able to take the answer and learn from it. Thanks.

var type = getURLparameter('type'); //from another function

if (type == "images"){
    var selectDiv =('divid');
    var selectField = ('selectid');
    document.getElementById(selectField).options[1].selected=true;
    document.getElementById(selectDiv).style.visibility="hidden";
}
else if (type == "pizza") {
    var selectDiv =('divid');
    var selectField = ('selectid');
    document.getElementById(selectField).options[2].selected=true;
    document.getElementById(selectDiv).style.visibility="hidden";
}
else (type == "cheese") {
    var selectDiv =('divid');
    var selectField = ('selectid');
    document.getElementById(selectField).options[3].selected=true;
    document.getElementById(selectDiv).style.visibility="hidden";
}
share|improve this question
3  
What about switch? –  David Rodrigues Nov 29 '11 at 1:17
1  
I'd format your HTML and such so that you won't need special cases for everything. –  Blender Nov 29 '11 at 1:18
    
I must agree with Blender's comment. If your structure is well done you shouldn't need the if-elses or a switch statement. –  Stephen P Nov 29 '11 at 1:23
1  
Seems to me that in the example code given the only thing changing in each case is the index into the .options collection, so whether you use a switch or keep the if/else if/else if structure the line to select the appropriate option is the only thing you need in each case - the other three lines can be moved up to before the first if (or before the switch if you, well...switch to that). –  nnnnnn Nov 29 '11 at 1:26
    
How would I do that? It's just one select field. –  acowley Nov 29 '11 at 1:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In the interest of not repeating code, I'd write your code like this with a lookup table for the index num and no repeated code for each option:

var typeNum = {
    images: 1,
    pizza: 2,
    cheese: 3
};

var type = getURLparameter('type');

if (type in typeNum) {
    document.getElementById('selectid').options[typeNum[type]].selected = true;
    document.getElementById('divid').style.visibility = "hidden";
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm pretty sure this is what I'm looking for. Thanks! –  acowley Nov 29 '11 at 1:27

Use a switch:

var selectDiv   = document.getElementById('divid'), 
    selectField = document.getElementById('selectid');

switch(type){
    case "images":
        selectField.options[1].selected=true;
        selectDiv.style.visibility="hidden";
    break;

    case "pizza":
        selectField.options[2].selected=true;
        selectDiv.style.visibility="hidden";
    break;

    case "cheese":
        selectField.options[3].selected=true;
        selectDiv.style.visibility="hidden";
    break;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Repeated code here that could be moved out of the switch statement. –  jfriend00 Nov 29 '11 at 2:26
    
Why the downvote? Is this answer not useful? –  AlienWebguy Nov 30 '11 at 17:27
    
The downvote wasn't me. I do think downvotes should require some explanation. –  jfriend00 Nov 30 '11 at 17:31

Put them in an object and look up the one you need.

var type_table = {
    images: {
        div_id: 'somevalue',
        select_id: 'somevalue',
        option_index: 0
    },

    pizza: {
        div_id: 'somevalue',
        select_id: 'somevalue',
        option_index: 1
    },

    cheese: {
        div_id: 'somevalue',
        select_id: 'somevalue',
        option_index: 2
    }
};

then...

var the_type = type_table[ type ];

document.getElementById(the_type.select_id).options[the_type.option_index].selected=true;
document.getElementById(the_type.div_id).style.visibility="hidden";

If the IDs are actually all the same, then naturally you should cache those elements instead of reselecting them, and the only thing you'd need to store in the table would be the index number.


It sounds like the only unique part is the index. If so, do this:

var type_table = {
    images:0,
    pizza:1,
    cheese:2, // and so on
};

var the_div = document.getElementById('div_id');
var the_select = document.getElementById('select_id');

then inside the function that is running the code...

the_select.options[ type_table[ type ] ].selected=true;
the_div.style.visibility="hidden";
share|improve this answer
    
Also used some of this solution. If I had some more rep. I'd upvote for sure. Thanks for your help. –  acowley Nov 30 '11 at 0:31

maybe a switch statement would help you

http://www.tutorialspoint.com/javascript/javascript_switch_case.htm

also, set the selectDiv before everything to reduce the amount of code :)

switch(type) {
    case 'images':
        //blah
        break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
oh.... well they are wrong, but the switch is right –  tekknolagi Nov 29 '11 at 1:24
    
@PHPBree there, fixed! –  tekknolagi Nov 29 '11 at 1:27
2  
@PHPBree: You could have offered a decent reference or two so that tekknolagi would know somewhere better to look in the future. –  mu is too short Nov 29 '11 at 1:33
1  
That's part of the problem with w3fools: they've gamed the system to get themselves to the top of the Google ranks so people unwittingly find them and assume they're associated with the real W3. Bookmark the MDN and es5.github.com links and go straight there in the future; any HTML or CSS searches googling should include "site:w3.org" to get the real thing. –  mu is too short Nov 29 '11 at 1:39
1  
@muistooshort damn! didn't know that about w3fools and those are great resources! –  tekknolagi Nov 29 '11 at 1:41
document.getElementById(selectField).options[(type == "images" ? 1 : (type == "pizza" ? 2 : 3))].selected=true;
document.getElementById(selectDiv).style.visibility="hidden";
share|improve this answer

you could use an array of functions, similar to the ever popular dictionary solution in c#,

var mySwitch={};
mySwitch['images'] = function(){ 
    var selectDiv =('divid');
    var selectField = ('selectid');
    document.getElementById(selectField).options[1].selected=true;
    document.getElementById(selectDiv).style.visibility="hidden";
};
mySwitch['pizza'] = function(){...};

then do

mySwitch[type]();
share|improve this answer

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