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I have the next code in C#, .NET 4.0 and Windows 7

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        DateTime startTime = DateTime.Now;
        Parallel.For(1, 100, ind => {
            System.Console.WriteLine("IND => " + ind + "; DEMORA: " + (DateTime.Now - startTime).TotalMilliseconds);
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
        });
        Console.Write("\nPresione una tecla para finalizar...");
        Console.ReadKey(true);
    }
}

The output of that code is similar to this:

IND => 8; DEMORA: 6001,9531
IND => 31; DEMORA: 6002,9297
IND => 55; DEMORA: 6006,8359
IND => 12; DEMORA: 6008,789
IND => 80; DEMORA: 6009,7656
IND => 57; DEMORA: 6009,7656
IND => 79; DEMORA: 6010,7422
IND => 34; DEMORA: 6011,7187
IND => 16; DEMORA: 6010,7422
IND => 19; DEMORA: 7001,9531
IND => 35; DEMORA: 7002,9297
IND => 59; DEMORA: 7006,8359
IND => 43; DEMORA: 7008,789
IND => 81; DEMORA: 7009,7656
IND => 58; DEMORA: 7010,7422
IND => 67; DEMORA: 7011,7187
IND => 83; DEMORA: 7011,7187
IND => 17; DEMORA: 7012,6953
IND => 20; DEMORA: 8001,9531
IND => 36; DEMORA: 8002,9297
IND => 60; DEMORA: 8006,8359
IND => 44; DEMORA: 8008,789
IND => 82; DEMORA: 8009,7656
IND => 71; DEMORA: 8009,7656
IND => 72; DEMORA: 8010,7422
IND => 68; DEMORA: 8011,7187
IND => 84; DEMORA: 8011,7187
IND => 18; DEMORA: 8012,6953

As you can see, the program runs groups of 9,10 threads per second (approximately). I can not understand why is this. I have understood that blocking a thread should not affect the execution of others. Therefore the problem should not be the call to Thread.Sleep.

But, if I delete the line 'Thread.Sleep(1000)' I get the following output:

IND => 78; DEMORA: 20,5078
IND => 79; DEMORA: 21,4844
IND => 69; DEMORA: 18,5547
IND => 53; DEMORA: 19,5312
IND => 97; DEMORA: 20,5078
IND => 80; DEMORA: 24,414
IND => 9; DEMORA: 13,6719
IND => 70; DEMORA: 26,3672
IND => 10; DEMORA: 29,2969
IND => 11; DEMORA: 29,2969
IND => 12; DEMORA: 30,2734
IND => 13; DEMORA: 30,2734
IND => 14; DEMORA: 31,25
IND => 15; DEMORA: 32,2265
IND => 71; DEMORA: 29,2969
IND => 72; DEMORA: 32,2265

This output is like I expected

Any explanation?

Thanks, Regards

share|improve this question
    
It certainly effects the execution of other threads, the job of the threadpool scheduler is to ensure that not too many threads run at the same time and that extra threads are scheduled (beyond the number of cores you have) if the threads don't complete in time. An auto-tuning algorithm was added in .NET 4 –  Hans Passant Nov 29 '11 at 1:49
    
I changed the above code to add logic to count the max number of threads running concurrently. If I increase Sleep time, the number of concurrent threads also increase. I noticed also that the start of threads are in groups of between 3-10 at regular intervals of 1 second (aprox). I can change this behavior? –  RemeR Nov 29 '11 at 2:24
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2 Answers 2

The Task Parallel Library will not start threads immediately. It will schedule execution on existing threads or create new threads based on number of CPUs. Therefore it looks like on your computer Task Parallel Library will use 10 threads and schedule your tasks to use these threads.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks.Then, I must suppose that in win7 with 4 cores CPU, max threads number for app is 10? Can I configure this? –  RemeR Nov 29 '11 at 1:38
    
I do not think it is that simple. I think because of the Sleep code TPL allowed up to 10 tasks to run. For more configuration of how tasks are executed, you will need to create a Task Scheduler –  Simon Nov 29 '11 at 1:45
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You're sleeping each of your threads individually.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but I do not sleep the thread that runs the other ones. Then the main thread should start all the threads before any finish (probably), right? –  RemeR Nov 29 '11 at 2:09
    
@RemeR: The TPL uses thread pooling; it will not start 100 threads. Instead, it reuses your existing threads to process the rest of the items. Print Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId as well to see how that works. –  SLaks Nov 29 '11 at 2:15
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