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I am performing a probability computation. I have many very very small numbers, all of which I want to subtract from 1, and do so accurately. I can accurately compute the logarithm of these small numbers. My strategy so far has been like so (using numpy):

Given an array of the log of the small numbers x, compute:

y = numpy.logaddexp.reduce(x)

Now I want to compute something like 1-exp(y) or even better log(1-exp(y)), but I'm not sure how to do so without losing all my precision.

In fact, even the logaddexp function is running into precision problems. Values in the vector x can range from -2 through -800, or even more negative. The vector y from above would basically have a whole section of numbers around 1e-16, which is the eps of the data type. So, for example, the accurately computed data could look like this:

In [358]: x
Out[358]: 
[-5.2194676211172837,
 -3.9050377656308362,
 -3.1619783292449615,
 -2.71289594096134,
 -2.4488395891021639,
 -2.3129210706827568,
 -2.2709987626652346,
 -2.3007776073511259,
 -2.3868404149802434,
 -2.5180718876609163,
 -2.68619816583087,
 -2.8849022632856958,
 -3.1092603032627686,
 -3.3553673369747834,
 -3.6200806272462351,
 -3.9008385919463073,
 -4.1955300857178379,
 -4.5023981074719899,
 -4.8199676154248081,
 -5.1469905756384904,
 -5.4824035553480428,
 -5.8252945959126876,
 -6.174877049340779,
 -6.5304687083067563,
 -6.8914750074202473,
 -7.25737538919104,
 -7.6277121540338797,
 -8.0020812775389558,
 -8.3801247986220773,
 -8.7615244716292437,
 -9.1459964426584435,
 -9.5332867613176404,
 -9.9231675781398394,
 -10.315433907978701,
 -10.709900863130784,
 -11.106401278287066,
 -11.50478366390567,
 -11.904910436107656,
 -12.30665638039909,
 -12.709907313918777,
 -13.114558916892051,
 -13.52051570882999,
 -13.927690148982549,
 -14.336001843810081,
 -14.745376846921289,
 -15.155747039147968,
 -15.567049578271309,
 -15.979226409456359,
 -16.39222382873956,
 -16.805992092998878,
 -17.22048507074976,
 -17.63565992888303,
 -18.051476851117201,
 -18.467898784496384,
 -18.884891210740903,
 -19.302421939667397,
 -19.720460922243518,
 -20.138980081145718,
 -20.557953156947775,
 -20.977355568292495,
 -21.397164284594595,
 -21.817357709992422,
 -22.237915577412224,
 -22.658818851739369,
 -23.080049641202237,
 -23.501591116172762,
 -23.923427434676114,
 -24.345543673975158,
 -24.767925767665417,
 -25.190560447772668,
 -25.61343519140047,
 -26.036538171518259,
 -26.459858211524278,
 -26.883384743252066,
 -27.307107768123842,
 -27.731017821180984,
 -28.155105937748402,
 -28.579363622513654,
 -29.003782820820732,
 -29.428355891997484,
 -29.853075584553352,
 -30.27793501309668,
 -30.702927636836705,
 -31.128047239545907,
 -31.553287910869187,
 -31.978644028878307,
 -32.404110243774596,
 -32.82968146265631,
 -33.255352835270173,
 -33.681119740674262,
 -34.106977774747804,
 -34.532922738484046,
 -34.958950627012712,
 -35.385057619298891,
 -35.811240068471022,
 -36.237494492735493,
 -36.663817566835519,
 -37.090206114019054,
 -37.516657098479527,
 -37.943167618239784,
 -38.369734898447348,
 -38.796356285056333,
 -39.223029238868548,
 -39.64975132991276,
 -40.076520232137909,
 -40.5033337184027,
 -40.930189655741344,
 -41.357086000888444,
 -41.784020796047173,
 -42.210992164885965,
 -42.637998308748706,
 -43.065037503066776,
 -43.492108093959985,
 -43.919208495015312,
 -44.346337184233221,
 -44.773492701130749,
 -45.200673643993753,
 -45.627878667267964,
 -46.055106479082156,
 -46.482355838895614,
 -46.909625555262096,
 -47.336914483704675,
 -47.764221524695017,
 -48.191545621730768,
 -48.618885759506213,
 -49.04624096217151,
 -49.473610291673936,
 -49.900992846179292,
 -50.328387758566748,
 -50.755794194994508,
 -51.183211353532613,
 -51.610638462858901,
 -52.0380747810147,
 -52.46551959421754,
 -52.892972215728378,
 -53.320431984769073,
 -53.747898265489198,
 -54.175370445978274,
 -54.602847937323247,
 -55.030330172705362,
 -55.457816606538813,
 -55.885306713645889,
 -56.312799988467418,
 -56.740295944308855,
 -57.167794112617116,
 -57.59529404228897,
 -58.02279529900909,
 -58.450297464615232,
 -58.877800136490578,
 -59.305302926981085,
 -59.732805462838542,
 -60.160307384683506,
 -60.587808346493375,
 -61.015308015110463,
 -61.442806069768608,
 -61.87030220164138,
 -62.297796113406662,
 -62.725287518829532,
 -63.15277614236129,
 -63.580261718755196,
 -64.007743992695964,
 -64.435222718445743,
 -64.862697659501919,
 -65.290168588270035,
 -65.717635285748088,
 -66.14509754122389,
 -66.572555151982783,
 -67.000007923029216,
 -67.427455666815376,
 -67.854898202982099,
 -68.282335358110231,
 -68.709766965479957,
 -69.137192864839108,
 -69.564612902180784,
 -69.992026929530198,
 -70.419434804735829,
 -70.8468363912732,
 -71.274231558051156,
 -71.701620179229167,
 -72.129002134037705,
 -72.556377306608397,
 -72.983745585807242,
 -73.411106865077045,
 -73.838461042282461,
 -74.265808019561746,
 -74.693147703185559,
 -75.120480003416901,
 -75.547804834380145,
 -75.97512211393132,
 -76.402431763534764,
 -76.829733708143749,
 -77.257027876085431,
 -77.684314198948414,
 -78.111592611476681,
 -78.538863051464546,
 -78.966125459656723,
 -79.393379779652037,
 -79.820625957809625,
 -80.24786394315754,
 -80.675093687306912,
 -81.102315144366912]

Then I try to compute the log sum of exponents:

In [359]: np.logaddexp.accumulate(x)
Out[359]: 
array([ -5.21946762e+00,  -3.66710221e+00,  -2.68983273e+00,
        -2.00815067e+00,  -1.51126604e+00,  -1.14067818e+00,
        -8.60829425e-01,  -6.48188808e-01,  -4.86276416e-01,
        -3.63085873e-01,  -2.69624488e-01,  -1.99028599e-01,
        -1.45996863e-01,  -1.06408884e-01,  -7.70565672e-02,
        -5.54467248e-02,  -3.96506186e-02,  -2.81859503e-02,
        -1.99225261e-02,  -1.40061296e-02,  -9.79701394e-03,
        -6.82045164e-03,  -4.72733966e-03,  -3.26317960e-03,
        -2.24396350e-03,  -1.53767347e-03,  -1.05026994e-03,
        -7.15209142e-04,  -4.85690052e-04,  -3.28980607e-04,
        -2.22305294e-04,  -1.49890553e-04,  -1.00858788e-04,
        -6.77380054e-05,  -4.54139175e-05,  -3.03974537e-05,
        -2.03154477e-05,  -1.35581905e-05,  -9.03659252e-06,
        -6.01552344e-06,  -3.99984336e-06,  -2.65671945e-06,
        -1.76283376e-06,  -1.16860435e-06,  -7.73997496e-07,
        -5.12213574e-07,  -3.38706792e-07,  -2.23809375e-07,
        -1.47785898e-07,  -9.75226648e-08,  -6.43149957e-08,
        -4.23904687e-08,  -2.79246430e-08,  -1.83858489e-08,
        -1.20995365e-08,  -7.95892319e-09,  -5.23300609e-09,
        -3.43929670e-09,  -2.25953475e-09,  -1.48391255e-09,
        -9.74194956e-10,  -6.39351406e-10,  -4.19466218e-10,
        -2.75121795e-10,  -1.80397409e-10,  -1.18254918e-10,
        -7.74993004e-11,  -5.07775611e-11,  -3.32619009e-11,
        -2.17835737e-11,  -1.42634249e-11,  -9.33764336e-12,
        -6.11190167e-12,  -3.99989955e-12,  -2.61737204e-12,
        -1.71253165e-12,  -1.12043465e-12,  -7.33052079e-13,
        -4.79645919e-13,  -3.13905885e-13,  -2.05519681e-13,
        -1.34650094e-13,  -8.83173582e-14,  -5.80300378e-14,
        -3.82338678e-14,  -2.52963381e-14,  -1.68421145e-14,
        -1.13181549e-14,  -7.70918073e-15,  -5.35155125e-15,
        -3.81152630e-15,  -2.80565548e-15,  -2.14872312e-15,
        -1.71971577e-15,  -1.43957518e-15,  -1.25665732e-15,
        -1.13722927e-15,  -1.05925916e-15,  -1.00835857e-15,
        -9.75131524e-16,  -9.53442707e-16,  -9.39286186e-16,
        -9.30046550e-16,  -9.24016349e-16,  -9.20080954e-16,
        -9.17512772e-16,  -9.15836886e-16,  -9.14743318e-16,
        -9.14029759e-16,  -9.13564174e-16,  -9.13260398e-16,
        -9.13062204e-16,  -9.12932898e-16,  -9.12848539e-16,
        -9.12793505e-16,  -9.12757603e-16,  -9.12734183e-16,
        -9.12718905e-16,  -9.12708939e-16,  -9.12702438e-16,
        -9.12698198e-16,  -9.12695432e-16,  -9.12693627e-16,
        -9.12692451e-16,  -9.12691683e-16,  -9.12691183e-16,
        -9.12690856e-16,  -9.12690643e-16,  -9.12690504e-16,
        -9.12690414e-16,  -9.12690355e-16,  -9.12690316e-16,
        -9.12690291e-16,  -9.12690275e-16,  -9.12690264e-16,
        -9.12690257e-16,  -9.12690252e-16,  -9.12690249e-16,
        -9.12690248e-16,  -9.12690246e-16,  -9.12690245e-16,
        -9.12690245e-16,  -9.12690245e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,
        -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16,  -9.12690244e-16])

Which ultimately leads to:

In [360]: np.logaddexp.reduce(x)
Out[360]: -9.1269024387687033e-16

so my precision is already obliterated. Any ideas on how to get around this?

Thanks! Uri

share|improve this question
    
I am just curious, what is your number for (if it is not a secret)? –  Binus Nov 29 '11 at 9:18
    
@UriLaserson If one of the answers helped, please mark it as accepted. –  Raymond Hettinger Nov 29 '11 at 19:25

6 Answers 6

In Python 2.7, we added math.expm1() for this use case:

>>> from math import exp, expm1
>>> exp(1e-5) - 1  # gives result accurate to 11 places
1.0000050000069649e-05
>>> expm1(1e-5)    # result accurate to full precision
1.0000050000166668e-05

Also, there is math.fsum() for the summation step without loss of precision:

>>> sum([.1, .1, .1, .1, .1, .1, .1, .1, .1, .1])
0.9999999999999999
>>> fsum([.1, .1, .1, .1, .1, .1, .1, .1, .1, .1])
1.0

Lastly, if nothing else helps, you can use the decimal module which supports ultra-high precision arithmetic:

>>> from decimal import *
>>> getcontext().prec = 200
>>> (1 - 1 / Decimal(7000000)).ln()
Decimal('-1.4285715306122546161332083855139723669559469615692284955124609122046580004888309867906750714454869716398919778588515625689415322789136206397998627088895481989036005482451668027002380442299229191323673E-7')
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, please check the edits, one problem is that the precision is already maxed out by the time I even get to the exponentiation. –  Uri Laserson Nov 29 '11 at 2:51

I suggest to replace exp() and log() with their Taylor series in the neighborhood of 0 and 1, correspondingly. This way, you will not be losing precision by using big numbers (my, I just called 1 a big number :^). Use Lagrange remainder formula or just the member's expression with some reserve to determine since when the discrepancy will go beyond your precision.

Update:

Python 2.7's math.expm1 (exp(x)-1) and math.log1p (log(1+x)) do this for you if the platform's C library's precision (typically double) is enough. (if not, you'll have to resort to special math software (x86's FPU can compute in extended precision)).

share|improve this answer

I'm not sure if this is what you want

numpy.expm1(x[, out]) 
Calculate exp(x) - 1 for all elements in the array.



>>> import numpy as np
>>> np.expm1(x).sum()
-200.0
>>> (-np.expm1(x)).sum()
200.0
>>> from scipy import special
>>> (-special.expm1(x)).sum()
200.0
>>> np.log((-special.expm1(x)).sum())
5.2983173665480363

Edit:

Sorry, I didn't realize that this is just the numpy version of Raymond Hettinger's answer.

(not an answer to the numerical problem)

I'm still not sure what exactly the question is, however, instead of throwing decimal or mpmath at it, maybe a reformulation of the problem will help. If you add up probabilities in Poisson, for example, you will eventually always get "close" to 1. But for some questions we can avoid some problems working with the survival function instead of the cdf.

share|improve this answer
    
Don't forget numpy.log1p –  matt Dec 1 '11 at 6:37
    
I played with log1p for this problem for a while. But since I'm not sure what the question actually asks for, I gave up. –  user333700 Dec 1 '11 at 16:40

Don't know that much about python, I do most of my work in Java but it seems to me that you would be better off performing the log-sum-exp trick on all values simultaneously first rather that do it two-by-two using numpy.logaddexp.accumulate.

A quick search in google shows a candidate amongst python libraries: scipy.misc.logsumexp.

In any case that would not be difficult to program yourself:

logsumexp(probs) := max(probs) + log(sum[i](exp(probes[i]-max(probs))))

so something like:

  maxValue = -Inf;
  for x in probs
     if x > maxValue then maxValue = x 
  expSum = 0
  for x in probs
     expSum += exp(x - maxValue)
  return log(expSum)

The returned single value, say p, is just the log of the sum of all probabilities in probs. Notice that if there is a large scale different between the largest and the smaller value in the input probabilities, the small ones will be disregarded but just if their contribution is very small in comparison with the large numbers which in most applications should be fine.

You could use more complex strategies to make those small values to count in case that there is a large number of small numbers, say probe = 0.5 + 1E-7 + 1E-7 … a millions times so adding up to 0.1. What you can do is either divide the single sums in several ones where values of roughly the same scale are added together first before being combined. or you can use the some in-between pivot value instead of the max, but you must make sure that the largest value is not too large because then exp(probs[i] - pivot) would cause an overflow in that case.

Once this is done you still need to do calculate log(1-exp(p))

For that I found this document describing a way to avoid as much precision loss as possible using logistic functions that you can find in most language math common libraries.

Maechler M, Accurately Computing log(1 − exp(− |a|)) Assessed by the Rmpfr package, 2012

The key is to use one of two possible approaches depending on the input value a.

Definitions:

log1mexp(a) := log(1-exp(a)) ### function that we seek to implement.
log1p(a) := log(1+a) # function provided by common math libraries.
exp1m(a) := exp(a) - 1 # function provided by common math libraries.

There is an obvious way to implement log1mexp using log1p:

log1mexp(a) := log1p(-exp(a))

With exp1m you can do:

log1mexp(a) := log(-expm1(a))

You should then use the log1p approach when a < log(.5) and the expm1 when a >= log(.5).

log1mexp(a) := (a < log(.5)) ? log1p(-exp(a)) : log(-expm1(a)).

Please refer to the external link for further info.

share|improve this answer

I used mpmath for similar problems. It's a very good and well documented 100% python library. If speed is an issue for you; consider using mpmath with gmpy. See this link to do so.

share|improve this answer

Exactly like Raymond Hettinger said, but you would of course need to multiply by -1 afterwards, because you want 1 - exp instead of exp - 1

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, please check the edits, one problem is that the precision is already maxed out by the time I even get to the exponentiation. –  Uri Laserson Nov 29 '11 at 2:50

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