Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I had this question in mind and since I just discovered this site I decided to post it here.

Let's say I have a table with a timestamp and a state for a given "object" (generic meaning, not OOP object); is there an optimal way to calculate the time between a state and the next occurrence of another (or same) state (what I call a "trip") with a single SQL statement (inner SELECTs and UNIONs aren't counted)?

Ex: For the following, the trip time between Initial and Done would be 6 days, but between Initial and Review it would be 2 days.

2008-08-01 13:30:00 - Initial
2008-08-02 13:30:00 - Work
2008-08-03 13:30:00 - Review
2008-08-04 13:30:00 - Work
2008-08-05 13:30:00 - Review
2008-08-06 13:30:00 - Accepted
2008-08-07 13:30:00 - Done

No need to be generic, just say what SGBD your solution is specific to if not generic.

share|improve this question
add comment

10 Answers 10

Here's an Oracle methodology using an analytic function.

with data as (
SELECT 1 trip_id, to_date('20080801 13:30:00','YYYYMMDD HH24:mi:ss') dt, 'Initial'  step from dual UNION ALL
SELECT 1 trip_id, to_date('20080802 13:30:00','YYYYMMDD HH24:mi:ss') dt, 'Work'     step from dual  UNION ALL
SELECT 1 trip_id, to_date('20080803 13:30:00','YYYYMMDD HH24:mi:ss') dt, 'Review'   step from dual  UNION ALL
SELECT 1 trip_id, to_date('20080804 13:30:00','YYYYMMDD HH24:mi:ss') dt, 'Work'     step from dual UNION ALL
SELECT 1 trip_id, to_date('20080805 13:30:00','YYYYMMDD HH24:mi:ss') dt, 'Review'   step from dual  UNION ALL
SELECT 1 trip_id, to_date('20080806 13:30:00','YYYYMMDD HH24:mi:ss') dt, 'Accepted' step from dual  UNION ALL
SELECT 1 trip_id, to_date('20080807 13:30:00','YYYYMMDD HH24:mi:ss') dt, 'Done'     step from dual )
select trip_id,
       step,
       dt - lag(dt) over (partition by trip_id order by dt) trip_time
from  data
/


1   Initial	
1   Work	    1
1   Review	    1
1   Work	    1
1   Review	    1
1   Accepted    1
1   Done	    1

These are very commonly used in situations where traditionally we might use a self-join.

share|improve this answer
add comment

PostgreSQL syntax :

DROP TABLE ObjectState;
CREATE TABLE ObjectState (
    object_id integer not null,--foreign key
    event_time timestamp NOT NULL,
    state varchar(10) NOT NULL,
    --Other fields 
    CONSTRAINT pk_ObjectState PRIMARY KEY (object_id,event_time)
);

For given state find first folowing state of given type

select parent.object_id,parent.event_time,parent.state,min(child.event_time) as ch_event_time,min(child.event_time)-parent.event_time as step_time
from 
    ObjectState parent
    join ObjectState child on (parent.object_id=child.object_id and parent.event_time<child.event_time)
where 
    --Starting state 
    parent.object_id=1 and parent.event_time=to_timestamp('01-Aug-2008 13:30:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss')
    --needed state
    and child.state='Review'
group by parent.object_id,parent.event_time,parent.state;

This query is not the shortest posible but it should be easy to understand and used as part of other queries :

List events and their duration for given object

select parent.object_id,parent.event_time,parent.state,min(child.event_time) as ch_event_time,
       CASE WHEN parent.state<>'Done' and min(child.event_time) is null THEN (select localtimestamp)-parent.event_time ELSE min(child.event_time)-parent.event_time END  as step_time
from 
    ObjectState parent
    left outer join ObjectState child on (parent.object_id=child.object_id and parent.event_time<child.event_time)
where parent.object_id=4    
group by parent.object_id,parent.event_time,parent.state
order by parent.object_id,parent.event_time,parent.state;

List current states for objects that are not "done"

select states.object_id,states.event_time,states.state,(select localtimestamp)-states.event_time as step_time
from
    (select parent.object_id,parent.event_time,parent.state,min(child.event_time) as ch_event_time,min(child.event_time)-parent.event_time as step_time
     from 
        ObjectState parent
        left outer join ObjectState child on (parent.object_id=child.object_id and parent.event_time<child.event_time)       
     group by parent.object_id,parent.event_time,parent.state) states
where     
    states.object_id not in (select object_id from ObjectState where state='Done')
    and ch_event_time is null;

Test data

insert into ObjectState (object_id,event_time,state)
select 1,to_timestamp('01-Aug-2008 13:30:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Initial' union    all
select 1,to_timestamp('02-Aug-2008 13:40:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Work' union all
select 1,to_timestamp('03-Aug-2008 13:50:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Review' union all
select 1,to_timestamp('04-Aug-2008 14:30:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Work' union all
select 1,to_timestamp('04-Aug-2008 16:20:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Review' union all
select 1,to_timestamp('06-Aug-2008 18:00:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Accepted' union all
select 1,to_timestamp('07-Aug-2008 21:30:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Done';


insert into ObjectState (object_id,event_time,state)
select 2,to_timestamp('01-Aug-2008 13:30:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Initial' union all
select 2,to_timestamp('02-Aug-2008 13:40:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Work' union all
select 2,to_timestamp('07-Aug-2008 13:50:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Review' union all
select 2,to_timestamp('14-Aug-2008 14:30:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Work' union all
select 2,to_timestamp('15-Aug-2008 16:20:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Review' union all
select 2,to_timestamp('16-Aug-2008 18:02:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Accepted' union all
select 2,to_timestamp('17-Aug-2008 22:10:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Done';

insert into ObjectState (object_id,event_time,state)
select 3,to_timestamp('12-Sep-2008 13:30:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Initial' union    all
select 3,to_timestamp('13-Sep-2008 13:40:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Work' union all
select 3,to_timestamp('14-Sep-2008 13:50:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Review' union   all
select 3,to_timestamp('15-Sep-2008 14:30:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Work' union all
select 3,to_timestamp('16-Sep-2008 16:20:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Review';


insert into ObjectState (object_id,event_time,state)
select 4,to_timestamp('21-Aug-2008 03:10:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Initial' union all
select 4,to_timestamp('22-Aug-2008 03:40:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Work' union all
select 4,to_timestamp('23-Aug-2008 03:20:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Review' union all
select 4,to_timestamp('24-Aug-2008 04:30:00','dd-Mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss'),'Work';
share|improve this answer
add comment

I don't think you can get that answer with one SQL statement as you are trying to obtain one result from many records. The only way to achieve that in SQL is to get the timestamp field for two different records and calculate the difference (datediff). Therefore, UNIONS or Inner Joins are needed.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm not sure I understand the question exactly, but you can do something like the following which reads the table in one pass then uses a derived table to calculate it. SQL Server code:

CREATE TABLE #testing
(
    eventdatetime datetime NOT NULL,
    state varchar(10) NOT NULL
)

INSERT INTO #testing (
    eventdatetime,
    state
) 
SELECT '20080801 13:30:00', 'Initial' UNION ALL
SELECT '20080802 13:30:00', 'Work' UNION ALL
SELECT '20080803 13:30:00', 'Review' UNION ALL
SELECT '20080804 13:30:00', 'Work' UNION ALL
SELECT '20080805 13:30:00', 'Review' UNION ALL
SELECT '20080806 13:30:00', 'Accepted' UNION ALL
SELECT '20080807 13:30:00', 'Done'

SELECT DATEDIFF(dd, Initial, Review)
FROM (
SELECT  MIN(CASE WHEN state='Initial' THEN eventdatetime END) AS Initial,
    	MIN(CASE WHEN state='Review' THEN eventdatetime END) AS Review
FROM #testing
) AS A

DROP TABLE #testing
share|improve this answer
add comment

It is probably easier if you have a sequence number as well as the time-stamp: in most RDBMSs you can create an auto-increment column and not change any of the INSERT statements. Then you join the table with a copy of itself to get the deltas

select after.moment - before.moment, before.state, after.state
from object_states before, object_states after
where after.sequence + 1 = before.sequence

(where the details of SQL syntax will vary according to which database system).

share|improve this answer
add comment
    -- Oracle SQl

    CREATE TABLE ObjectState
    (
        startdate date NOT NULL,
        state varchar2(10) NOT NULL
    );



   insert into ObjectState 
   select to_date('01-Aug-2008 13:30:00','dd-Mon-rrrr hh24:mi:ss'),'Initial' union all
   select to_date('02-Aug-2008 13:30:00','dd-Mon-rrrr hh24:mi:ss'),'Work' union all
   select to_date('03-Aug-2008 13:30:00','dd-Mon-rrrr hh24:mi:ss'),'Review' union all
   select to_date('04-Aug-2008 13:30:00','dd-Mon-rrrr hh24:mi:ss'),'Work' union all
   select to_date('05-Aug-2008 13:30:00','dd-Mon-rrrr hh24:mi:ss'),'Review' union all
   select to_date('06-Aug-2008 13:30:00','dd-Mon-rrrr hh24:mi:ss'),'Accepted' union all
   select to_date('07-Aug-2008 13:30:00','dd-Mon-rrrr hh24:mi:ss'),'Done';

-- Days in between two states

  select  o2.startdate - o1.startdate as days
  from ObjectState o1, ObjectState o2
  where o1.state = 'Initial'
  and o2.state = 'Review';
share|improve this answer
add comment
create table A (
    At datetime not null,
    State varchar(20) not null
)
go
insert into A(At,State)
select '2008-08-01T13:30:00','Initial' union all
select '2008-08-02T13:30:00','Work' union all
select '2008-08-03T13:30:00','Review' union all
select '2008-08-04T13:30:00','Work' union all
select '2008-08-05T13:30:00','Review' union all
select '2008-08-06T13:30:00','Accepted' union all
select '2008-08-07T13:30:00','Done'
go
--Find trip time from Initial to Done
select DATEDIFF(day,t1.At,t2.At)
from
    A t1
    	inner join
    A t2
    	on
    		t1.State = 'Initial' and
    		t2.State = 'Review' and
    		t1.At < t2.At
    	left join
    A t3
    	on
    		t3.State = 'Initial' and
    		t3.At > t1.At and
    		t4.At < t2.At
    	left join
    A t4
    	on
    		t4.State = 'Review' and
    		t4.At < t2.At and
    		t4.At > t1.At
where
    t3.At is null and
    t4.At is null

Didn't say whether joins were allowed or not. Joins to t3 and t4 (and their comparisons) let you say whether you want the earliest or latest occurrence of the start and end states (in this case, I'm asking for latest "Initial" and earliest "Review")

In real code, my start and end states would be parameters

Edit: Oops, need to include "t3.At < t2.At" and "t4.At > t1.At", to fix some odd sequences of States (e.g. If we removed the second "Review" and then queried from "Work" to "Review", the original query will fail)

share|improve this answer
add comment

I think that your steps (each record of your trip can be seen as a step) can be somewhere grouped together as part of the same activity. It is then possible to group your data on it, as, for example:

SELECT Min(Tbl_Step.dateTimeStep) as tripBegin, _   
       Max(Tbl_Step.dateTimeStep) as tripEnd _
FROM 
       Tbl_Step 
WHERE 
       id_Activity = 'AAAAAAA'

Using this principle, you can then calculate other aggregates like the number of steps in the activity and so on. But you will not find an SQL way to calculate values like gap between 2 steps, as such a data does not belong either to the first or to the second step. Some reporting tools use what they call "running sums" to calculate such intermediate data. Depending on your objectives, this might be a solution for you.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I tried to do this in MySQL. You would need to use a variable since there is no rank function in MySQL, so it would go like this:

set @trip1 = 0; set @trip2 = 0;
SELECT trip1.`date` as startdate, datediff(trip2.`date`, trip1.`date`) length_of_trip
FROM
(SELECT @trip1 := @trip1 + 1 as rank1, `date` from trip where state='Initial') as trip1
INNER JOIN
(SELECT @trip2 := @trip2 + 1 as rank2, `date` from trip where state='Done') as trip2
ON rank1 = rank2;

I am assuming that you want to calculate the time between 'Initial' and 'Done' states.

+---------------------+----------------+
| startdate           | length_of_trip |
+---------------------+----------------+
| 2008-08-01 13:30:00 |              6 |
+---------------------+----------------+
share|improve this answer
add comment

Ok, this is a bit beyond geeky, but I built a web application to track my wife's contractions just before we had a baby so that I could see from work when it was getting close to time to go to the hospital. Anyway, I built this basic thing fairly easily as two views.

create table contractions time_date timestamp primary key;

create view contraction_time as
SELECT a.time_date, max(b.prev_time) AS prev_time
   FROM contractions a, ( SELECT contractions.time_date AS prev_time
           FROM contractions) b
  WHERE b.prev_time < a.time_date
  GROUP BY a.time_date;

create view time_between as 
SELECT contraction_time.time_date, contraction_time.prev_time, contraction_time.time_date - contraction_time.prev_time
   FROM contraction_time;

This could be done as a subselect obviously as well, but I used the intermediate views for other things as well, and so this worked out well.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.