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How can I access the data in a parent's class, which is protected, when passed into a derived class.

class parent
{ 
    protected:
        int a;
};

class child : public parent
{
    void addOne(parent * &);
};

void child::addOne(parent * & parentClass)
{
    parentClass->a += 1;
}

int main()
{
    parent a;
    child b;

    parent* ap = &a;

    b.addOne(ap);
}
share|improve this question
1  
Just a += 1. Base members become part of your class. –  Kerrek SB Nov 29 '11 at 2:45
    
Please provide a code sample that actually shows what you're trying to do, and that contains no irrelevant errors (i.e. addOne(a) is not a valid call). –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 29 '11 at 2:46
    
Sorry, fixed that. What I'm trying to do is edit a binary tree in a parent class, from a child class. (one parent class declared, one child class declared). The work around I have is a wrapper function in the parent that passes the binary tree head pointer to the child. –  CornSmith Nov 29 '11 at 2:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You cannot access protected data via a pointer/reference to the base class. This is to prevent you from breaking the invariants that other derived classes may have on that data.

class parent
{
    void f();
    // let's pretend parent has these invariants:
    // after f(), a shall be 0
    // a shall never be < 0.

    protected:
        int a;
};

class child : public parent
{
public:
    void addOne(parent * &);
};


class stronger_child : public parent
{
public:
    stronger_child(int new_a) {
        if(new_a > 2) a = 0;
        else a = new_a;
    }
    // this class holds a stronger invariant on a: it's not greater than 2!
    // possible functions that depend on this invariant not depicted :)
};

void child::addOne(parent * & parentClass)
{
    // parentClass could be another sibling!
    parentClass->a += 1;
}

int main()
{
    stronger_child a(2);
    child b;

    parent* ap = &a;

    b.addOne(ap); // oops! breaks stronger_child's invariants!
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you!! I didn't realize I could break other children this way. I redid my algorithm so that the parent class manages the data that I need, even though it doesn't quite make sense for the parent. It's better than breaking OO rules. ++Martinho –  CornSmith Nov 29 '11 at 3:54
    
@CornSmith please check out my slight edit. I made a mistake previously. You're not restricted to the current instance but to pointers/references of the current type. A type knows its own invariants so it can manipulate other instances of that type safely (modulo bugs). For example, this works ideone.com/8LvA3 –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 29 '11 at 4:39
    
@R-Martinho-Fernandes So you're saying that one child class can edit another child class's parent's variables if it's the same type. Thanks for the tip! (and nice code on ideone, that was above and beyond) –  CornSmith Nov 29 '11 at 9:11
    
Let's hope that child does not break stronger_child invariant. –  curiousguy Dec 3 '11 at 7:15
    
@curiousguy I'm sorry, I don't understand. What do you mean by that? Isn't that what I show in my answer? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 3 '11 at 7:19

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