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I have two List<int> instances. Now I want to combine them into a third list.

public List<int> oldItemarry1 // storing old item
{
    get 
    { 
        return (List<int>)ViewState["oldItemarry1 "]; 
    }
    set 
    { 
        ViewState["oldItemarry1 "] = value; 
    }
}

public List<int> newItemarry1 // storing new item
{
    get
    { 
        return (List<int>)ViewState["newItemarry1 "]; 
    }
    set 
    { 
        ViewState["newItemarry1 "] = value; 
    }
}

public List<int> Itemarry1 // want to combine both the item
{
    get
    { 
        return (List<int>)ViewState["Itemarry1 "]; 
    }
    set 
    { 
        ViewState["Itemarry1 "] = value; 
    }
}

Please some one tell me how to do that?

share|improve this question
    
Do you need a setter on Itemarry1? Also, what do you want to occur if someone adds an entry to any of the first two lists (do you expect it also to be added to the third list)? Using the techniques listed here by everyone will give you a 'point in time' concatentation of the lists - it won't be live. Even more complicated - what do you expect to occur if the user adds an item to the third (combined) list? –  mjwills Nov 29 '11 at 4:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use the Union method; it will exclude duplicates.

int[] combinedWithoutDups = oldItemarry1.Union(newItemarry1).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
And Concat will include duplicates if you want that. –  Joe Nov 29 '11 at 4:13
    
@Mike - Yep, and Christopher has that answer already :) –  Adam Rackis Nov 29 '11 at 4:14
    
@Adam Rackis: oldItemarry1 i am getting 0 and only i am getting newItemarry1, so its not getting added, oldItemarry1 i am getting on page load and new itemarray i am getting when i am adding the item, after adding the item i want to combine both old and new itemarray1 –  Rocky Nov 29 '11 at 4:57
    
@Rocky, I'm afraid I didn't follow what your problem is, but I promise you, calling oldItemarry1.Union(newItemarry1) will combine the elements of both an return a unique collection. –  Adam Rackis Nov 29 '11 at 5:01
    
can i do list this List<int> combinedWithoutDups = oldItemarray1.Union(newItemarray1).ToList(); –  Rocky Nov 29 '11 at 5:04

LINQ has the Concat method:

return oldItemarry1.Concat(newItemarry1).ToList();

That just puts the list together. LINQ also has Intersect method, which will give you only items that exist in both lists and the Except method, which only gives you items that are present in either, but not both. The Union method give you all items between the two lists, but no duplicates like the Concat method.

If LINQ is not an option, you can just create a new list, add the items from each list to both via AddRange, and return that.

EDIT:

Since LINQ is not an option, you can do it a few ways:

Combine lists with all items, including duplicates:

var newList = new List<int>();
newList.AddRange(first);
newList.AddRange(second);
return newList

Combine without duplicate items

var existingItems = new HashSet<int>();
var newList = new List<int>();

existingItems.UnionWith(firstList);
existingItems.UnionWith(secondList);
newList.AddRange(existingItems);

return newList;

This of course assumes that you're using .NET 4.0, since that is when HashSet<T> was introduced. It's a shame you aren't using Linq, it really excels at things like this.

share|improve this answer
    
i am not using linq –  Rocky Nov 29 '11 at 4:53
1  
@Rocky - From what I read, you are trying to use the Union method to get the job done via @Adam's answer, which is part of Linq. So, I suppose the question is, can you or can you not use Linq? Keep in mind Linq is NOT only used in SQL. Linq to objects is for use on any collection that implements IEnumerable (arrays, lists, sets, collections, etc...) –  Christopher Currens Nov 29 '11 at 5:12

You can combine two lists:

List<int> result = new List<int>();
result.AddRange(oldList1);
result.AddRange(oldList2);

The list result now has all the elements of both lists.

share|improve this answer
    
on page load i am getting oldlist, and new list i am getting when i am getting new items, now both the items i want to add –  Rocky Nov 29 '11 at 4:55

Here's one way to approach it:

public List<int> Itemarry1()
{
    List<int> combinedItems = new List<int>();

    combinedItems.AddRange(oldItemarray1);
    combinedItems.AddRange(newItemarray1);

    return combinedItems;
}
share|improve this answer

As a best practice, try to use IEnumerable rather than List when you can. Then, to make this work best you will want a read-only property:

public IEnumerable<int> Itemarry1 // want to combine both the item
{
    get
    { 
        return ((List<int>)ViewState["oldItemarry1 "]).Concat((List<int>)ViewState["Itemarry1"]); 
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you need a point in time combination of two lists into a third list, Union and Concat are appropriate, as mentioned by others.

If you want a 'live' combination of the two lists (such that changes to the first and second list are automatically reflected in the 'combined' list) then you may want to look into Bindable LINQ or Obtics.

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