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I am trying to increment a variable using the ++ operator but I keep getting NaN as a result and I'm not sure why. Here is my code:

var wordCounts = { };
var x = 0
var compare = "groove is in the heart";
        var words = compare.split(/\b/);
        for(var i = 1; i < words.length; i++){
            if(words[i].length > 2){
                wordCounts["_" + words[i]]++;
            }
        }


alert(wordCounts.toSource());
share|improve this question
    
The sample has an off-by-one error: the first index of words is 0, not 1. Also, should not "I" and "a" count as words? You can change the regexp so as to filter out the non-word characters, thus removing the need for the words[i].length > 2 check. See if you can figure how. –  outis Nov 29 '11 at 5:06
    
yeah the 1 was me just trying stuff, actually I need to exclude any words less than 3 characters long and I'll also have to filter out the words "was" ,"the","and" words like that. –  mcgrailm Nov 29 '11 at 13:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The value of wordCounts["_" + words[i]] is initially undefined so when you ++ it, it gives you NaN. Just change your code to:

if (wordCounts["_" + words[i]]) {
    wordCounts["_" + words[i]]++;
} else {
    wordCounts["_" + words[i]] = 1;
}
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Or wordCounts["_" + words[i]] = (wordCounts["_" + words[i]] || 0) + 1; –  nnnnnn Nov 29 '11 at 5:11
1  
Yes, there are many ways to write it. Putting the key "_" + words[i] into a variable would also be a good idea for readability and a small optimization. –  this.lau_ Nov 29 '11 at 5:12
    
Yep. +1 for being first with both an explanation of the problem and a solution. –  nnnnnn Nov 29 '11 at 5:26

You're trying to increment an object (wordCounts[]++) it's not a number so it can't be incremented, which is why you're getting that error. What are you actually trying to do (in plain English)?

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so how can i make this work since I don't know what the words are going to be –  mcgrailm Nov 29 '11 at 5:07

Try something like...

var key = "_" + words[i];

if (wordCounts[key]) {
    wordCounts[key]++
} else {
    wordCounts[key] = 1;
}

You are trying to increment undefined which is giving you NaN.

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To be able to use the ++ operator (which takes a number and increments it by one) the target needs to have a number first.

Attempt a check to see if the object is defined, and if not initialize it by setting it's value to 1.

if ('undefined' === typeof wordCounts["_" + words[i]]) {
            wordCounts["_" + words[i]] = 0;
}

Something like:

var wordCounts = {};
var x = 0
var compare = "groove is in the heart";
var words = compare.split(/\b/);
for (var i = 1; i < words.length; i++) {
    if ('undefined' === typeof wordCounts["_" + words[i]]) {
        wordCounts["_" + words[i]] = 0;
    }
    if (words[i].length > 2) {
        wordCounts["_" + words[i]]++;
    }
}
alert( JSON.stringify( wordCounts ) );
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They do in some environments. –  alex Nov 29 '11 at 5:09

What you're basically doing is

undefined++

Which will result in...

NaN

Try...

wordCounts["_" + words[i]] = (wordCounts["_" + words[i]]++ || 1);

Since NaN is a "falsey" value the || will fall back to 1.

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Please don't do x = x++ type statements, they always lead to confusion. (In some languages - not sure about JS - the result is not even defined in the language spec.) –  nnnnnn Nov 29 '11 at 5:21

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