Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is part of a lab for school dealing with recursion and binary tree. If I go to insert 4 or 5 numbers and output the result I get just 3 numbers back. Here is the code for insert:

Node *insert(Node *t, int key) {
    Node *insertParent;
    Node *result=NULL;

    if (t!=NULL) {
        result=search(t,key,insertParent);
    } else {
        t=new Node;
        t->data=key;
        t->leftchild=NULL;
        t->rightchild=NULL;
        return t;
    }

    if (result==NULL) {
        if (insertParent->data>key) {
            insertParent->leftchild=new Node;
            insertParent->leftchild->data=key;
            insertParent->leftchild->leftchild=NULL;
            insertParent->leftchild->rightchild=NULL;
            return insertParent->leftchild;
        } else if (insertParent->data<key) {
            insertParent->rightchild=new Node;
            insertParent->rightchild->data=key;
            insertParent->rightchild->leftchild=NULL;
            insertParent->rightchild->rightchild=NULL;
            return insertParent->rightchild;
        }
    } else
        return NULL;
}

But I believe the trouble is within the search function, specifically the node pointer by reference parent:

Node* search(Node *t, int key, Node *&parent) {
    if (t!=NULL) {
        parent=t;
        if (t->data==key)
            return t;
        else if (t->data>key)
            return search(t->leftchild,key,t);
        else 
            return search(t->rightchild,key,t);
    } else
        return NULL;
}

I have a function that outputs the tree and have checked it against a tree I built manually and it works fine:

void inorder(Node *t)
{
    if (t!=NULL) {
        if (t->leftchild!=NULL)
            inorder(t->leftchild);

        cout << t->data << ", ";

        if (t->rightchild!=NULL)
            inorder(t->rightchild);                     
    }  
}

Not looking for an answer just looking for an area I should look at.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

Your suspicion is correct. Trace how the top-level 'parent' parameter gets updated once you search more than one node deep.

share|improve this answer
add comment
Node* search(Node *t, int key, Node *&parent)
{
    if(t!=NULL)
    {
    parent=t;
    if (t->data==key)
        return t;

    else if (t->data>key)
        return search(t->leftchild, key, parent); // use “parent” because you want to assign parent to this variable

    else 
        return search(t->rightchild,key, parent);
    }
    else     return NULL;

}
share|improve this answer
1  
"Not looking for an answer just looking for an area I should look at.". -- Nice job not-answering. –  AShelly Nov 29 '11 at 5:42
    
@AShelly still Dont ware of where the problem is? you want to assign "insertParent" to the insert point. right? so, you should keep it traced during the recursive binary search, otherwise you got wrong parent pointer. the area you should look at is the notion "reference" of C++. –  jianyi Nov 29 '11 at 5:50
    
putting parent in for t does not solve the problem –  aaron burns Nov 29 '11 at 21:40
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

So I discovered my problem was with the search function. It did have to do with the reference parent node variable. I had to use four else/ifelse statement to be able to decide which way to go, recursively or not.

Node* search(Node *t, int key, Node *&parent) {
    if (t!=NULL) {
        if (t->data==key) {
            parent=NULL;
            return t;
        } else if (t->data>key && t->leftchild!=NULL) {
            return search(t->leftchild,key,parent); // think this needs returned
        } else if (t->data>key && t->leftchild==NULL) {
            parent=t;
            return NULL;
        } else if (t->data<key && t->rightchild!=NULL) {
            return search(t->rightchild,key,parent); //think this needs returned
        } else if (t->data<key && t->rightchild==NULL) {
            parent=t;
            return NULL;
        }
    } else {
        parent=NULL;
        return NULL;
    }
}

This change in the search function necessitated a change in the insert function:

Node *insert(Node *t, int key) {
    Node *insertParent=NULL;
    Node *result=NULL;

    if (t!=NULL) {
        result=search(t,key,insertParent);
    } else {
        t=new Node;
        t->data=key;
        t->leftchild=NULL;
        t->rightchild=NULL;
        return t;  
    }

    if (insertParent==NULL && result!=NULL) {
        return NULL;
    } else if (insertParent!=NULL && result==NULL) {
        //key not found need to add
        if (insertParent->data>key) {
            insertParent->leftchild=new Node;
            insertParent->leftchild->data=key;
            insertParent->leftchild->leftchild=NULL;
            insertParent->leftchild->rightchild=NULL;
            return insertParent->leftchild;
        } else {
            insertParent->rightchild=new Node;
            insertParent->rightchild->data=key;
            insertParent->rightchild->leftchild=NULL;
            insertParent->rightchild->rightchild=NULL;
            return insertParent->rightchild;
        }
    }
}

Thanks to all who helped...

(Also: I answered my own question. Is this what I should of done or should I of edited my post? Would think that people would rather see the whole process and not have me delete the old non-working code...)

share|improve this answer
    
You should edit the original question to make the question clearer, but the answer should be what gets the check mark. If you are going to answer your own question, think not just of "here is the working code" but as if you were someone trying to learn from reading the discussion. As you are new I've done some editing to help give some ideas vs. your original: stackoverflow.com/revisions/8306096/1 –  HostileFork Nov 29 '11 at 21:45
    
I updated your answer also to show sort of what I'm talking about. Note that if you are going to share your inorder printing function, you might as well put it in the question because it wasn't a "new" thing learned in the course of the answering...so I moved it to the question. You can see how much easier it is to take in when you interweave short code samples with descriptive text instead of pasting a long scrolling box of code. Also StackOverflow is like Wikipedia and saves the history of revisions to Q&A so things don't get lost: stackoverflow.com/revisions/8317919/1 –  HostileFork Nov 29 '11 at 21:58
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.