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I want to clean up the threads which pointers are stored in STL vector. I am doing it as below. Is this right way of doing as i am deleting entries while looping thourgh vector or there is better way to do this.

Please suggest.

template <typename threadFuncParamT >
bool ThreadPool<threadFuncParamT>::KillSleepingThreads()
{
  if(m_vecThreads.size() != 0)
  {
      for (; std::vector< ThreadWrapper < threadFuncParamT>* >::iterator itrCollThreads !=  values.end(); )
      {
    ThreadWrapper < threadFuncParamT> *pWrapper = m_vecThreads.back();
            m_vecThreads.pop_back();
            delete pWrapper;
      } // for loop
  } // if condition
}

Thanks!

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1  
Do use a smart pointer. Use std::unique_ptror another if that's not supported. –  GManNickG Nov 29 '11 at 6:23

3 Answers 3

If you're allowed to use C++11, then make it cute:

for (auto it = m_vecThreads.begin() ; it !=  m_vecThreads.end(); ++it )
{
     delete *it;
}
m_vecThreads.clear();

You can make it even more cute (in C++11, of course - thanks to @celtschk's comment):

for (auto & ptr: m_vecThreads) //it is called range-based for loop
{ 
    delete ptr; 
}
m_vecThreads.clear();

Or if you're not allowed to use C++11, then replace auto (in the first for loop) with this:

  typename std::vector<ThreadWrapper<threadFuncParamT*>::iterator
//^^^^^^^^ you've to typename as well

Note that you've to use typename as well, for iterator is a dependent name.

Also, the following is not needed, remove it from your code:

if(m_vecThreads.size() != 0) // not needed!
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With C++11, you can even make it more cute: for (auto ptr: m_vecThreads) { delete ptr; } m_vecThreads.clear(); –  celtschk Nov 29 '11 at 7:29
1  
even more cute. std::vector<std::unique_ptr<T>> threads; Not deletion. –  Jagannath Nov 29 '11 at 7:53

Try this in your function:

     for(size_t i = 0; i < m_vecThreads.size(); ++i)
     {
        delete m_vecThreads[i];
     }
     m_vecThreads.clear();
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It's generally considered better form to use iterators to iterate a collection, hence the term "iterator." –  Chris Parton Nov 29 '11 at 6:46
    
@ChrisParton you're right for general cases. But in the case, we could get better performance for random access and don't have to worry about the iterator invalidation problem compared to the original version. For me, I prefer to std::for_each. The reason is that it could applied to most of the standard containers and the compilers usually give optimized std::for_each for random access iterators. –  BruceAdi Nov 29 '11 at 6:57
    
@BruceAdi: Invalidated iterators isn't a worry here. If it were, your increment logic wouldn't be what it is. –  GManNickG Nov 29 '11 at 7:12
1  
Isn't it a little contradictory to talk about performance, when you call vector.size() for every pass of your loop? It is trivial to restructure it. However the overhead of deleteing is so high that this is meaningless in the first place, so you can just use iterators and std::for_each, or range-based for for better readability anyway. –  Fiktik Nov 29 '11 at 7:20
    
@Fiktik Agreed. Thanks for point this out. –  BruceAdi Nov 29 '11 at 7:34

It looks a lot more complicated then it needs to. If you are really trying to just delete every item in the vector, just delete each item then clear the entire vector.

for(std::vector<ThreadWrapper<threadFuncParamT*>>::iterator
        i = m_vecThreads.begin();
    i != m_vecThreads.end();
    ++i)
{
    delete *i;
}

m_vecThreads.clear();

As an aside, it's usually a better practice to have a vector of smart pointers (eg boost::shared_ptr) than having to explicitly delete items.

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