Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm using class from some assembly(source code is not available), so it is not possible to change their's code I need to add extension method for explicit cast operator, is there any way to achieve that? (I have tried to add as regular extension method, but without success)

 public static explicit operator MembershipUser(this MembershipUser membership, User user)
    {
        return new MembershipUser("SimplyMembershipProvider", user.UserName, user.UserId, user.Email, null, null, user.IsApproved, user.IsLocked,
            user.CreateDate, user.LastLoginDate, user.LastActivityDate, user.CreateDate, DateTime.MinValue);
    }

how can i solve this?

share|improve this question
1  
possible duplicate of Operator Overloading with C# Extension Methods – Jason Down Nov 29 '11 at 6:12
up vote 11 down vote accepted

You cannot overload operators via Extension methods.

Best you can do with an extension method:

public static MembershipUser ConvertToMembershipUser(this User user)
{
    return new MembershipUser("SimplyMembershipProvider", 
                              user.UserName, 
                              user.UserId, 
                              user.Email, 
                              null, 
                              null, 
                              user.IsApproved, 
                              user.IsLocked,
                              user.CreateDate, 
                              user.LastLoginDate, 
                              user.LastActivityDate,
                              user.CreateDate, 
                              DateTime.MinValue);
}

MembershipUser membershipUser = aUser.ConvertToMembershipUser();
share|improve this answer
    
Quick pedantic point: you can't override operators at all - you can overload them - but not with extension methods, as you say. – Jon Skeet Nov 29 '11 at 6:16
    
@JonSkeet - It's a bad habit of mine to use override and overload interchangeably, even though I know better. :) – Christopher Currens Nov 29 '11 at 6:17

As others have said, you can't overload operators using extension methods - but a simple extension method would still be useful:

public static MembershipUser ToMembershipUser(this User user)
{
    return new MembershipUser("SimplyMembershipProvider",
        user.UserName, user.UserId, user.Email, null, null, 
        user.IsApproved, user.IsLocked, user.CreateDate, 
        user.LastLoginDate, user.LastActivityDate, user.CreateDate,
        DateTime.MinValue);
}

Then just use it as:

User user = ...;
MembershipUser membershipUser = user.ToMembershipUser();

Personally I find this clearer than using an explicit conversion anyway - I very rarely go in for operator overloading. In particular, given that the classes certainly sound related, a naive user might expect this code:

User user = ...;
MembershipUser membershipUser = (MembershipUser) user;

... to be a normal reference conversion, expecting MembershipUser to be a class derived from User. This is important in terms of object identity - if that were the case, it wouldn't be changing the object involved (and changes to the object referred to by user would still be visible via membershipUser).

Creating a ToMembershipUser method makes it clearer that you're converting from one form to a new object of the other type. All IMO, of course :)

share|improve this answer

No, you cannot add an extension conversion.

Explicit or implicit conversions may only be defined if you control the source code for one of the types involved. In your case, you can control either MembershipUser or User, you do not need to control both. But you must control one.

If you control neither, you'll simply need to define the conversion in a method of some other class whose job it is to control such a conversion.

class UserConverter 
{
    public MembershipUser ConvertFrom(User user) 
    {
        return ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Not saying this is a good practice (read other answers for why you should not want this, but if the classes are not sealed, this is possible, just not using extension methods).

Basically, you can create a surrogate class inheriting User who defines the casting operator, something like:

    class UserSurrogate : User
    {
        public static explicit operator UserSurrogate(MemberShipUser other)
        {
            return  new UserSurrogate() { Name = other.Name };
        }
    }

    class User
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }

    class MemberShipUser
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }   
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.