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I'm aware of the threading issues etc that this could cause and of its dangers but I need to know how to do this for a security project I am doing at school. I need to know how to call a function in a remote address space of a given calling convention with arguments - preferably recovering the data the remote function has returned though its really not required that I do.

If I can get specifics from the remote function's function prototype at compile time, I will be able to make this method work. I need to know how big the arguments are and if the arguments are explicitly declared as pointers or not (void*, char*, int*, etc...)

I.e if I define a function prototype like:

typedef void (__cdecl *testFunc_t)(int* pData);

I would need to, at compile time, get the size of arguments at least, and if I could, which ones are pointers or not. Here we are assuming the remote function is either an stdcall or _cdecl call.

The IDE I am using is Microsoft Visual Studio 2007 in case the solution is specific to a particular product.

Here is my plan:

  1. Create a thread in the remote process using CreateRemoteThread at the origin of the function want to call, though I would do so in a suspended state.

  2. I would setup the stack such that the return address was that of a stub of code allocated inside of the process that would call ExitThread(eax) - as this would exit the thread with the function's return value - I would then recover this by by using GetExitCodeThread

  3. I would also copy the arguments for the function call from my local stack to that of the newly created thread - this is where I need to know if function arguments are pointers and the size of the arguments.

  4. Resume the thread and wait for it to exit, at which point I will return to the caller with the threads exit code.

I know that this should be doable at compile time but whether the compiler has some method I can use to do it, I'm not sure. I'm also aware all this data can be easily recovered from a PDB file created after compiling the code and that the size of arguments might change if the compiler performs optimizations. I don't need to be told how dangerous this is, as I am fully aware of it, but this is not a commercial product but a small project I must do for school.

The question: If I have a function prototype such as typedef void (__cdecl testFunc_t)(int pData);

Is there anyway I can get the size of this prototype's arguments at compile time(i.e in the above example, the arguments would sum to a total size of sizeof(int*) If, for example, I have a function like:

template<typename T> unsigned long getPrototypeArgLength<T>()
{ 
   //would return size of arguments described in the prototype T 
} 

//when called as

getPrototypeArgLength<testFunc>()
share|improve this question
    
I'm not quite sure what your question is. You've described what you want to do... so does it work for you? –  Greg Hewgill Nov 29 '11 at 8:51
    
Sorry Greg, I should've been more clear. If I have a function prototype such as typedef void (__cdecl testFunc_t)(int pData); Is there anyway I can get the size of this prototype's arguments at compile time(i.e in the above example, the arguments would sum to a total size of sizeof(int*) If, for example, I have a function like: template<typename T> unsigned long getPrototypeArgLength<T>() { //would return size of arguments described in the prototype T } Sorry if I used the wrong terminology here. Thanks :) –  Jeremy Nov 29 '11 at 9:06
    
Specifically, I need help w\ step 3 –  Jeremy Nov 29 '11 at 9:12
    
I think you're just going to have to look up the gory details of the function calling conventions. (In 32 bit code they're pretty simple, luckily.) There's no portable way to get this information, because it's not portable. You can always write a dummy function with the correct signature, compile a call to it with optimisation off, and have a look at exactly what the generated assembly code does. –  Alan Stokes Nov 29 '11 at 10:08
    
Thanks Alan - I already know how stdcall and cdecl call work on a 32 bit system (thankfully they aren't too difficult to figure out.) the problem is trying to figure the size of the arguments of a given function prototype during compile time. Take a look at my edit where I clarify what I need help with, it shows what I want to do with a template function. Thanks for your help. Thanks :) –  Jeremy Nov 29 '11 at 10:55

2 Answers 2

This seems like quite a school project...

  1. For step 3 you can use ReadProcessMemory / WriteProcessMemory (one of them). For example, the new thread could receive the address (on the calling process), during the thread creation, of the parameters on the start (begin and end). Then it could read the caller process memory from that region and copy it to its own stack.

  2. Did you consider using COM for this whole thing? you could probably get things done much easier if you use a mechanism that was designed especially for that.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, the remote process isn't designed such that its functions can be called - but via studying one finds that they can be without interrupting the process. –  Jeremy Nov 29 '11 at 9:25
    
I guess you are talking about the 2ns point I made. What I meant was for you to create a thread that will initiate COM and expose a wrapper for the function. This will allow you to easily extend this to other functions that you may need to export in the future. –  OSH Nov 29 '11 at 9:29
    
Ah, I see. However wouldn't I need to know information such as the size and type of the function's arguments before building a COM wrapper around it? The question above boils down to how I get this information at compile-time from a prototype function defined like typedef void (__cdecl testFunc_t)(int pData) - I don't know if you saw my edit, I just added it to my question. I don't want to put code into the comment because it doesn't format well. –  Jeremy Nov 29 '11 at 9:55
    
I know you can do it in asm (use BP and SP, if I recall correctly). I suggest you post another question specifically about "how do I get the (number of / size of / ?) parameters of a method during compile time" or something like that. –  OSH Nov 29 '11 at 10:34
    
Alright, thanks Oren. I will let this one go for a day and see how far it gets before I make another. I can use the difference between ESP and EBP if the caller uses a std\cdecl calling convention to get the size of the caller's stack frame, but the problem is the stack frame also includes space allocated for i.e local variables and possibly arguments for other function as well. With that said though, I suppose copying over a little extra data I don't need won't hurt. I'll look into it. Thanks :) –  Jeremy Nov 29 '11 at 10:41
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Alright, I figured out that I can use the BOOST library to get a lot of type information at compile-time. Specifically, I am using boost::function_traits however, if you look around the boost library, you will find that you can recover quite a bit of information. Here's a bit of code I wrote to demonstrate how to get the number of arguments of a function prototype.

(actually, I haven't tested the below code, its just something I'm throwing together from another function I've made and tested.)

template<typename T>
unsigned long getArgCount()
{
    return boost::function_traits<boost::remove_pointer<T>::type>::arity;
}

void (*pFunc)(int, int);

2 = getArgCount<BOOST_TYPEOF(pFunc)>();
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I find checking if T is of a function pointer or not isn't really necessary as it won't compile if it isn't. –  Jeremy Nov 30 '11 at 15:46

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