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When I try to remove some characters in each line using sed, I want to see what to be removed in advance using sed, what should I do? for example, I have a source code file like below, and I want to remove the line numbers at the beginnings:

            102.      for (int i=0; i < args.length; ++i) {
            103.        if ("-skip".equals(args[i])) {
                104.          DistributedCache.addCacheFile(new Path(args[++i]).toUri(), conf);
                105.          conf.setBoolean("wordcount.skip.patterns", true);
                106.        } else {
                107.          other_args.add(args[i]);
                108.        }
            109.      }

what can I do with sed to test the regexp for what to be removed later using 's'(meaning replaced with empty string)? well, for this specific example, what's right regexp to remove the line numbers. is it possible to replace them with the right indents for this being source code using sed? that would be powerful!

Thanks.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since Jaypal already gave an answer showing the changes with an ERE, I'll give one with a BRE:

sed 's/^[[:space:]]*[[:digit:]]\+\.//'

I also used POSIX character classes, to show another option and because I find them easier to remember.

To see exactly what you're going to change, there are a couple of reasonable possibilities. You could use the same regex with grep -o:

grep -o '^[[:space:]]*[[:digit:]]\+\.'

This will select only the part of the line that matches the regex, just showing the indented line numbers in this case.

Another approach would be to use sed again. You can use & to indicate the matching text in the replace string, which lets you indicate the selected regions, e.g. with stars:

sed 's/^[[:space:]]*[[:digit:]]\+\./***&***/'

which gives:

***            102.***      for (int i=0; i < args.length; ++i) {
***            103.***        if ("-skip".equals(args[i])) {
***                104.***          DistributedCache.addCacheFile(new Path(args[++i]).toUri(), conf);
***                105.***          conf.setBoolean("wordcount.skip.patterns", true);
***                106.***        } else {
***                107.***          other_args.add(args[i]);
***                108.***        }
***            109.***      }
share|improve this answer
    
Although Jaypal provides good knowledges, this answer appears to be more for what I want and certainly the right reply for my question! – leslie Nov 29 '11 at 11:13

May be something like this could help

sed -r 's/^\s*[0-9]+\.//' file  # Corrected as @Michael specified in the comments, no need for `g`.

By default sed only works on BRE (Basic Regular Expression). \s means space and in order to use this, we use the -r option which forces sed to use ERE (Extended Regular Expression).

^ means beginning of the line. So we add \s followed by * (which means 0 or more) followed by number class [0-9] followed by + (which means 1 or more) and then a . and remove this in the replacement section. Notice how we escape the . because . means any character in RegEx. So in order to use the literal . we escape it.

Execution:

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat file
102.      for (int i=0; i < args.length; ++i) {
            103.        if ("-skip".equals(args[i])) {
                104.          DistributedCache.addCacheFile(new Path(args[++i]).toUri(), conf);
                105.          conf.setBoolean("wordcount.skip.patterns", true);
                106.        } else {
                107.          other_args.add(args[i]);
                108.        }
            109.      }

[jaypal:~/Temp] sed -r 's/^\s*[0-9]\+\.//g' file
      for (int i=0; i < args.length; ++i) {
        if ("-skip".equals(args[i])) {
          DistributedCache.addCacheFile(new Path(args[++i]).toUri(), conf);
          conf.setBoolean("wordcount.skip.patterns", true);
        } else {
          other_args.add(args[i]);
        }
      }

To identify the matched part, you can use something like this -

sed -r 's/(^\s*[0-9]+\.)(.*)/-->\1<--\2/' file

[jaypal:~/Temp] sed -r 's/(^\s*[0-9]+\.)(.*)/-->\1<--\2/' file
-->102.<--      for (int i=0; i < args.length; ++i) {
-->            103.<--        if ("-skip".equals(args[i])) {
-->                104.<--          DistributedCache.addCacheFile(new Path(args[++i]).toUri(), conf);
-->                105.<--          conf.setBoolean("wordcount.skip.patterns", true);
-->                106.<--        } else {
-->                107.<--          other_args.add(args[i]);
-->                108.<--        }
-->            109.<--      }
share|improve this answer
2  
It fixed even the intendation which the OP managed to break by inserting the numbers ;-) – hirschhornsalz Nov 29 '11 at 9:04
    
Thanks for the quick and good answer. if I want to 'print' what to be replaced, something like: sed -r 's/(^\s*[0-9]+\.)/p\1' file, which doesn't work, assume 'p' for print, '\1' means the matched part in the 1st group, but what can I do? Thanks. – leslie Nov 29 '11 at 9:09
1  
You don't need to use EREs to use \s; it is a GNU extension available in both BREs and EREs. – Michael J. Barber Nov 29 '11 at 9:22
    
Thanks Michael! Good info! – jaypal singh Nov 29 '11 at 9:24
1  
I don't see why you specified a global replace, perhaps you could clarify that? – Michael J. Barber Nov 29 '11 at 9:31

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