Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two tables tableA and tableB as described bellow

desc tableA
GUID
PROPERTY_NAME
PROPERY_VALUE
ANOTHER_COL_1
ANTHER_COL_2

desc tableB
GUID
PROPERY_NAME
PROPERTY_VALUE
RANDOM_COL_1
RANDOME_COL_2

I have the following query to fetch the list of entries which have matching values for property_name which here is "URL"

SELECT A.GUID as SOURCE_GUID, 
       B.GUID as DESTINATION_GUID 
FROM
       tableA A,
       tableB B
WHERE
       A.PROPERTY_NAME = "URL" AND
       A.PROPERY_NAME  = B.PROPERTY_NAME AND
       A.PROPERTY_VALUE = B.PROPERTY_VALUE

The issue here is as propery values are URLs, they may or may not have trailing slash. I want the join to happen regardless of trailing slash. Please suggest a better way of achieving the same with out using an PL/SQL procedures to remove the trailing slash.

share|improve this question
    
"Please suggest a better way of achieving the same with out using an PL/SQL procedures to remove the trailing slash" Translation: I have poor data quality processes but I want to keep them because I like creating work for myself. –  APC Nov 29 '11 at 10:48

3 Answers 3

You have two options.

The first is clean your data before use.

Before any URL is stored in the system, add or remove (as prefered) a slash if necessary. In this way ensure that all URLs are stored in the same format for ease of use.

The second is clean your data at run time.

I do not advocate these options as they incur unnecessary overheads and can prevent optimal use of indexes.

RTRIM(A.PROPERTY_VALUE, '/') = RTRIM(B.PROPERTY_VALUE, '/')

Cleanest code, but likely prevent index use.

  • Values from both Table A and Table B are being modified
  • This likely requires a SCAN on both tables

Or...

  • (Ensure B.PROPERTY_VALUE ends with '/', then do the comparison); OR
  • (Ensure B.PROPERTY_VALUE does NOT end with '/', then do the comparison)

If either of these conditions are true, the URLs match.

A.PROPERTY_VALUE = (CASE WHEN RIGHT(B.PROPERTY_VALUE, 1) = '/' THEN B.PROPERTY_VALUE ELSE B.PROPERTY_VALUE + '/' END)
OR
A.PROPERTY_VALUE = (CASE WHEN RIGHT(B.PROPERTY_VALUE, 1) = '/' THEN RTRIM(B.PROPERTY_VALUE, '/') ELSE B.PROPERTY_VALUE END)

Much messier, but May be more index friendly

  • Only the B table values are being altered
  • a SCAN on B is necessary
  • an INDEX SEEK on A is now possible
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for data cleansing upfront. Otherwise, if we insist on loading shonky data we have to handle it every time we use it. –  APC Nov 29 '11 at 10:46
    
Then you really, Really, want to start cleaning up your data when it's being loaded. That way you can encapsulate your "clean-up" code in one place, AND using that data then becomes ALOT more performant. –  MatBailie Nov 29 '11 at 21:53

You can easily remove trailing slashes using the RTRIM function:

...
AND RTRIM(A.PROPERTY_VALUE,'/') = RTRIM(B.PROPERTY_VALUE,'/')
share|improve this answer
SELECT A.GUID as SOURCE_GUID, 
       B.GUID as DESTINATION_GUID 
FROM   tableA A,
       tableB B
WHERE  A.PROPERTY_NAME = "URL"
AND    A.PROPERY_NAME = B.PROPERTY_NAME
AND    RTRIM(A.PROPERTY_VALUE, '/') = RTRIM(B.PROPERTY_VALUE, '/')
share|improve this answer
    
...I take it you realise that you need ANDs in the where clause. It might be a bit more efficient to do an inner join rather than a cross join, too. –  Xophmeister Nov 29 '11 at 10:08
    
He has AND at the end of the lines. –  MatBailie Nov 29 '11 at 10:16
    
I edited it after @Xophmeister comment –  Ram Nov 29 '11 at 10:52
    
Xophmeister: At least in the Oracle world, that's just syntactic sugar, the query optimizer takes care of the execution plan anyway. –  ammoQ Nov 29 '11 at 14:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.