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#include "stdafx.h"

class Base
{
public:
    Base(){}
    virtual ~Base(){}
private:
    Base(const Base &other) ;   // Only declaration! No definition.
    Base &operator=(const Base &other);
} ;

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    const Base b ;          // ok
    const Base *pb = &Base() ;      // ok
    const Base &qb = Base() ;       // Illegal, why?

    return 0;
}

and then, see the codes below:

#include "stdafx.h"

class Base
{
public:
    Base(){}
    virtual ~Base(){}
public:
    Base(const Base &other) ;           // Only declaration! No definition.
    Base &operator=(const Base &other);
} ;

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    const Base b ;          // ok
    const Base *pb = &Base() ;      // ok
    const Base &qb = Base() ;       // It's ok! why?

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
You should add a bit more text explaining what you're looking for. – Sean Nov 29 '11 at 10:20
4  
note that const Base *pb = &Base() is not ok and should yield a warning from your compiler – stijn Nov 29 '11 at 10:22
2  
This const Base *pb = &Base() ; is definitely not OK. It's a microsoft extension. – ybungalobill Nov 29 '11 at 10:22
1  
const Base &bp = Base(); involves the lifetime extension of a reference to a temporary object (§ 12.2 Temporary Objects) – sehe Nov 29 '11 at 10:27
    
@ybungalobill It is not a Microsoft extension. GCC and the standard allow it also. It is, however, still a good way to crash your program. – Crashworks Nov 29 '11 at 21:21

Ignoring const *Base = &Base(); which takes the address of a temporary, and in most cases will lead to Undefined Behavior as at the end of the expression the temporary will be destroyed and any dereference of the pointer is UB

When you try to bind a constant reference to a temporary, the language states that the operation is (semantically) that of copying the temporary to an unnamed variable and then binding the reference to that variable.

const type& r = f();    // where f() returns a type (not a reference)

is equivalent to:

const type __tmp = f(); // __tmp variable created by the compiler
const type& r = __tmp;

This explains why in the first case, because the copy constructor is not accessible, the compiler is not allowed to create the __tmp variable (const type __tmp = f() fails to compile) and it tells you.

Now the standard allows the compiler to elide copies of variables, and in particular in that line, the compiler is allowed to place __tmp and the result of f() in exactly the same location in memory1 and avoid performing the copy. In your second case, the compiler has checked that the copy is allowed (copy constructor is available), but has optimized away the copy, and thus it does not call the function.

Why does it consider that the constructor is available even if it has not been defined? Well, that is part of the separate compilation model, the compiler, when making the decision as to whether the constructor is valid or not, checks only the current translation unit and it does not know if the copy constructor would be available in a different TU. Because the copy is elided, no call to the copy constructor is placed in the binary, and the linker does not need to resolve that symbol, so it compiles and links fine.


1For more details, and outside of the scope of the standard, most compilers (all I know of) implement return by value of a large object (one that does not fit in a register) by passing a hidden pointer to the function, so the caller reserves the space for __tmp in the local stack and passes that pointer to f(). With this calling convention the returned object does not exist at all in this case, even if it would if the call was not used to initialize a new object.

In the case in the example, where the returned type is fits in the registers many compilers will store the resulting value in a register before returning. This is the exact situation where copying (conceptually) has to be done, as you cannot bind a reference to a register, but again the call to the copy constructor is elided and the compiler just stores the register in the location of __tmp.

share|improve this answer
    
const *Base = &Base() is also allowed by GCC (even though it's obviously nonsense). – Crashworks Nov 29 '11 at 10:37
    
@Crashworks You are right, I am so used to that being an error in the program that I expected the compiler not to accept it. The code is not incorrect, but is probably semantically invalid (you cannot dereference the pointer ever, as that would be UB). At any rate, GCC does warn that you are doing something wrong. Thanks for pointing the error out. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 29 '11 at 10:43

The compiler's reported errors give you the answer:

const Base &qb = Base() ;

calls CBase's copy constructor, which in your top example is private, and thus inaccessible.

Also, this:

const Base *pb = &Base();

is undefined behavior and will result in a crash, because pb points at a temporary object. In more detail, what that line of code does is:

  1. Create room for a temporary Base object on the stack, and call the Base() constructor on it
  2. Assign pb to point at the temporary object's address.
  3. Destroy the temporary object, because it hasn't been assigned to anything. (You've only assigned its address to a pointer, which doesn't affect its lifetime.)
  4. pb now points at garbage.
share|improve this answer
    
You may be interested in looking u p @sehe's answer and comments there. (no, I'm not saying you're wrong, I just doubt how right you are). – Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 29 '11 at 10:31
    
const Base &qb = Base(); should be a reference binding, could you explain why the copy constructor should be called? – fefe Nov 29 '11 at 10:34
    
@fefe David Rodriguez has the more detailed answer. – Crashworks Nov 29 '11 at 10:36
    
@fefe: Short answer: because the language says so. What is called lifetime extension of a temporary is actually the creation of a new unnamed variable in the program by the compiler, initialized by copying from the temporary, and then binding the reference to that variable. I don't have the standard at hand to produce the appropriate quotes. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 29 '11 at 10:55
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas Thank you very much. I've got the idea. – fefe Nov 29 '11 at 10:59

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