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Using Mathematica

Binary String: "FBCD"

#1
I: ImportString["FBCD", {"Binary", "Bit"}]
O: {0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, \
    0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0}

#2
I: ImportString["FBCD", {"Binary", "UnsignedInteger32"}]
O: {1145258566}

#3
I: ImportString["FBCD", {"Binary", "Byte"}]
O: {70, 66, 67, 68}

What is actual math formula using the byte values {70, 66, 67, 68} in the output of #3 to get the int32 value {1145258566} in the output of #2?

(70^4)+(66^3)+(67^2)+68 I know this isn't correct, looking for the correct formula if there is one.

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

( ( ( 68 * 256 ) + 67 ) * 256 + 66 ) * 256 + 70 = 1145258566

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Henrik: thank you. –  Jason Caldwell Nov 29 '11 at 10:40
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It is

FromDigits[Reverse[{70, 66, 67, 68}], 256]

That is, 68*256^3 + 67*256^2 + 66*256 + 70.

Looking at the incorrect formula you mentioned, I suggest reading a bit about place-value notation. Also think about how if you have a kind of variable that can store k different values (one byte can store 256 different values, commonly identified with integers through 0..255), then 2 of these variables can store k*k = k^2 different values, more generally, n of them can store k^n different values in total.

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Thanks Szabolcs. –  Jason Caldwell Nov 29 '11 at 10:56
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