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For example: If I have two .h files

process1.h and process2.h

and they contain two function with different output variables.

process1.h:

function(int var)
 {
 return 2*var;
}

process2.h:

function(int var)
 {
 return 10*var;
}

Can this be done in main.c:

int main()
{
int a = 2;
#include "process1.h"
printf("%d",function(a));    //output is 4

EXCLUDE #INCLUDE "process1.h" ?????    <----can this be done in any way??
#include "process2.h"
printf("%d",function(a));    //output is 20

}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, you cannot "un-include" a file. Think of all the preprocessor directives (lines starting with #) as happening before the actual C compiler even sees the source file. They just operate on the text of the file, and the preprocessor could be implemented as a separate step that just feeds new text into the actual compiler.

The best way to modify the actions of an include depending on the caller is to use further macros inside the included files, that you can #define before including them.

Still, your overall syntax is off, you can't (typically) nest functions in C.

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No, and you should not try to write a program with two functions of the same name.

In the special case that the functions are actually defined in the header file (instead of just prototypes), you can do this:

#define function function_file1
#include "file1.h"
#undef function

#define function function_file2
#include "file2.h"
#undef function

int
main (void)
  {
    int a = 2;

    printf ("%d\n", function_file1 (a));
    printf ("%d\n", function_file2 (a));
  }

BUT if you rename a function prototype then you haven't actually renamed the real function, so you'll get undefined symbol error when you link.

In any case, if you have two functions defined with the same name then it won't link anyway, not matter what else you do in the sources. (In C++, it is sometimes possible to define two things with the same name, but the One-Definition-Rule means the linker is allowed to assume they are both the same thing really and just pick one.)

This is why libraries are supposed to use names that won't be used elsewhere - usually by adding a common prefix to all symbol names (e.g. my_unique_lib_initialize()).

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Why not use array of function pointers. Sure you need to initialize it at the start but I think it probably solves what you want to do.

int process1_function(int var);
int process2_function(int var);

int main(void)
{
    int i, a = 10;
    int (* functions[2])(int);

    functions[0] = process1_function;
    functions[1] = process2_function;

    for(i=0; i < 2; i++)
    {
        printf("%d", (functions[i])(a));
    }

    return 0;
}

If you do not need to dynamically change which function you're going to call you can also just prefix the functions:

int process1_function(int var);
int process2_function(int var);

int main(void)
{
   printf("%d",process1_function(a));
   printf("%d",process2_function(a));

   return 0;
}
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