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I'm converting my program to run as a daemon on Linux. I'd like to use the python-daemon package to save repeating the work. However, I need to support python 2.4.

The example given on the page uses the with keyword so implies python 2.5; context managers are also listed as being supported from 2.5.

Can I just call the __enter__() and __exit__() methods myself instead? Or is there more to it than that?

This question nearly answers my question, but just misses it at the last minute.

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If you can have another daemon, then supervisord would bypass your problem. –  Noufal Ibrahim Nov 29 '11 at 10:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As far as I can tell from the source code, it should be easily possible to use python-daemon in Python 2.4. (I don't have a Python 2.4 installation around to actually try, though.) The __enter__() and __exit__() methods of DaemonContext are essentially aliases for open() and close(), so the equivalent of

with daemon.DaemonContext():
    do_main_program()

would simply be

context = daemon.DaemonContext()
context.open()
try:
    do_main_program()
finally:
    context.close()

I couldn't find anything Python 2.5 specific while skimming through all of the source code. (There are a few Python 2.4 specific constructs, though, like a few decorators and reversed(), so it won't work with Python 2.3 out of the box.)

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That's what I wanted to know. Thanks! –  wrgrs Nov 29 '11 at 15:52
    
@wilbo: So it actually did work with Python 2.4? (Just to make sure future visitors of this page will actually find the answer to the question.) –  Sven Marnach Nov 29 '11 at 16:01
1  
Yes, it works fine. I'll comment here again if I do come across any problems. –  wrgrs Nov 29 '11 at 16:11

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