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My problem is to create a class which would let to use an object (settings container or simply container) safely. I have more than 10 methods where I have to repeat the same actions: save the the container's state, change the state, do some job, restore the state, return results. Example:

public List<String> childKeys() {
    //saving state (repeated many time in other methods)
    final String clientGroup = clientSettings.group();
    //changing state  (repeated many time in other methods)
    clientSettings.endAllGroups();
    clientSettings.beginGroup(currentGroup);
    //doing job (exclusive for each method)
    final List<String> childKeys = clientSettings.childKeys();
    //restoring state  (repeated many time in other methods)
    clientSettings.endAllGroups();
    clientSettings.beginGroup(clientGroup);

    return childKeys;
}

I need doing this to prevent a user changing system settings and want to avoid writing the same code many times.
Do you see any way to redesign the code so the methods calls could be prepared and cleaned up automatically?

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Can you save it once at the start and restore at the end? In any case, this sounds a like a work around when the real fix wouldn't require you to do this. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 29 '11 at 11:17
    
@PeterLawrey, no, clientSetting state can be requested many times from the outside and it must stay the same for the environment –  Andrey Atapin Nov 29 '11 at 11:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I understand you well, you want to make sure a certain code is called before and/or after a certain set of methods?

Have you considered AOP? That would be a nice way to add the same code to a bunch of method calls without polluting your code with superclasses / extra-calls all over the place.

Spring-AOP is a nice implementation of it, which uses AspectJ under the hood. Have a look.

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Yes, you get me right. The project is huge (2M lines of code). I'm afraid I can't use AOP on some single part of the project, can I?. –  Andrey Atapin Nov 29 '11 at 11:43
    
Sure you can, that's the beauty of it, you can define where any specific advice is used (package, class names, method name pattern, etc.) –  Guillaume Nov 29 '11 at 11:43

Create an abstract class that has the basic flow and uses abstract methods that the concrete class must implement.

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There are several options, one would be to apply the Command Pattern. This may not make sense if the different functions (methods) only differ in a few lines, in that case an AOP solution may be the better choice - as described by @Guillaume.

Example:

public abstract class Command<T> {

    public final T execute() {

        /* do common stuff... */
        clientSettings.endAllGroups();
        clientSettings.beginGroup(currentGroup);

        /* do the concrete stuff... */
        T t = this.performConcrete();

        /* do common stuff... */
        clientSettings.endAllGroups();
        clientSettings.beginGroup(clientGroup);

        return t;
    }

    protected abstract T performConcrete();
}

And a concrete implementation:

public class ChildKeysCommand<List<String>> extends Command {

    protected List<String> performConcrete() {
        return clientSettings.childKeys();
    }

}

And the caller:

ChildKeysCommand c = new ChildKeysCommand();
List<String> keys = c.execute();
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Maybe you can make an atomic method that makes the two methods (endAllGroups and beginGroup), a method called changeState(Group group)... and in this case the method will be changed or modified whenever you like...

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As people have suggested, using an AOP framework is the obvious best choice.

If you for some reason can not use one, or you want to do it with minimal changes to codebase, you can achieve the same functionality by creating a proxy class using a java.lang.reflect.Proxy . You only need to document it extremely well...

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