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I made a test to compare string operations in several languages for choosing a language for the server-side application. The results seemed normal until I finally tried C++, which surprised me a lot. So I wonder if I had missed any optimization and come here for help.

The test are mainly intensive string operations, including concatenate and searching. The test is performed on Ubuntu 11.10 amd64, with GCC's version 4.6.1. The machine is Dell Optiplex 960, with 4G RAM, and Quad-core CPU.

in Python (2.7.2):

def test():
    x = ""
    limit = 102 * 1024
    while len(x) < limit:
        x += "X"
        if x.find("ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ", 0) > 0:
            print("Oh my god, this is impossible!")
    print("x's length is : %d" % len(x))

test()

which gives result:

x's length is : 104448

real    0m8.799s
user    0m8.769s
sys     0m0.008s

in Java (OpenJDK-7):

public class test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int x = 0;
        int limit = 102 * 1024;
        String s="";
        for (; s.length() < limit;) {
            s += "X";
            if (s.indexOf("ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ") > 0)
            System.out.printf("Find!\n");
        }
        System.out.printf("x's length = %d\n", s.length());
    }
}

which gives result:

x's length = 104448

real    0m50.436s
user    0m50.431s
sys     0m0.488s

in Javascript (Nodejs 0.6.3)

function test()
{
    var x = "";
    var limit = 102 * 1024;
    while (x.length < limit) {
        x += "X";
        if (x.indexOf("ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ", 0) > 0)
            console.log("OK");
    }
    console.log("x's length = " + x.length);
}();

which gives result:

x's length = 104448

real    0m3.115s
user    0m3.084s
sys     0m0.048s

in C++ (g++ -Ofast)

It's not surprising that Nodejs performas better than Python or Java. But I expected libstdc++ would give much better performance than Nodejs, whose result really suprised me.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;
void test()
{
    int x = 0;
    int limit = 102 * 1024;
    string s("");
    for (; s.size() < limit;) {
        s += "X";
        if (s.find("ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ", 0) != string::npos)
            cout << "Find!" << endl;
    }
    cout << "x's length = " << s.size() << endl;
}

int main()
{
    test();
}

which gives result:

x length = 104448

real    0m5.905s
user    0m5.900s
sys     0m0.000s

Brief Summary

OK, now let's see the summary:

  • javascript on Nodejs(V8): 3.1s
  • Python on CPython 2.7.2 : 8.8s
  • C++ with libstdc++: 5.9s
  • Java on OpenJDK 7: 50.4s

Surprisingly! I tried "-O2, -O3" in C++ but noting helped. C++ seems about only 50% performance of javascript in V8, and even poor than CPython. Could anyone explain to me if I had missed some optimization in GCC or is this just the case? Thank you a lot.

share|improve this question
14  
You are testing a mixture of operations, you should probably try to divide the test into different tests that perform different checks for performance, for example: growing strings, or finding, or ... currently you cannot know where the time is being spent. And BTW, this is probably a quite useless test to decide on a language... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 29 '11 at 11:38
16  
Try s.reserve(limit); before the loop. –  PlasmaHH Nov 29 '11 at 11:38
16  
@AshBurlaczenko possibly because strings in Java are immutable. I suppose s += "X" is a performance killer there. That's the reason StringBuilder exists. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 29 '11 at 11:39
24  
@AshBurlaczenko: In java strings are immutable and pooled, therefore dead slow. Normally you use stringbuilders to assemble strings. This whole thing here is comparing apples and oranges anyways. –  PlasmaHH Nov 29 '11 at 11:41
8  
You're also including the runtime startup and termination of each language in your results. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 29 '11 at 11:46
show 18 more comments

11 Answers

It's not that std::string performs poorly (as much as I dislike C++), it's that string handling is so heavily optimized for those other languages.

Your comparisons of string performance are misleading, and presumptuous if they are intended to represent more than just that.

I know for a fact that Python string objects are completely implemented in C, and indeed on Python 2.7, numerous optimizations exist due to the lack of separation between unicode strings and bytes. If you ran this test on Python 3.x you will find it considerably slower.

Javascript has numerous heavily optimized implementations. It's to be expected that string handling is excellent here.

Your Java result may be due to proper string handling, or some other poor case. I expect that a Java expert could step in and fix this test with a few changes.

As for your C++ example, I'd expect performance to slightly exceed the Python version. It does the same operations, with less interpreter overhead. This is reflected in your results. Preceding the test with s.reserve(limit); would remove reallocation overhead.

I'll repeat that you're only testing a single facet of the languages implementations. The results for this test do not reflect the overall language speed.

I've provided a C version to show how silly such pissing contests can be:

#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void test()
{
    int limit = 102 * 1024;
    char s[limit];
    size_t size = 0;
    while (size < limit) {
        s[size++] = 'X';
        if (memmem(s, size, "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ", 26)) {
            fprintf(stderr, "zomg\n");
            return;
        }
    }
    printf("x's length = %zu\n", size);
}

int main()
{
    test();
    return 0;
}

Timing:

matt@stanley:~/Desktop$ time ./smash 
x's length = 104448

real    0m0.681s
user    0m0.680s
sys     0m0.000s
share|improve this answer
3  
FWIW the difference between Python 2.7 and 3.2 is just under 10%. It is possible that PEP 393 will remove that difference in Python 3.3. Also it might be worth mentioned that searching strings in Python uses a form of Boyer-Moore so when the string gets longer it should gain an advantage over languages that do a plain search. –  Duncan Nov 29 '11 at 12:20
    
@Matt: Well, the C program is too extreme... I didn't tried to make a battle or contest between languages, for each language has its optimization in different ways. I just want to find a language that can proceed strings with quite good efficiency. The program just described a case that a program reads from an input(console or socket), maybe decrypts it then, and searches through the string for a specified pattern. My test program simplified the procedure and was just a demo, of course. The result just reminds me C++ is not always the sharpest knife. And thanks anyway :) –  Wu Shu Nov 29 '11 at 14:01
1  
@Wu Shu: If the specific pattern to search for is fixed and predetermined, you can construct an automaton to search for the pattern. This will be much faster than repeated calls to std::string::find. –  swegi Nov 29 '11 at 15:43
3  
@WuShu: actually, C and C++ are probably the sharpest knives. It's just that Python and Node.js may be chainsaws. It's heavy and sometimes overkill, but when you tire in C++ you appreciate the "batteries included" approach they took in Python. –  Matthieu M. Nov 29 '11 at 20:38
3  
In java, using StringBuilder instead of String speeds it up (on my machine) aproximately 4 times, rest is searching. In java, string is immutable, so what he is doing is atrociously wrong string manipulation in java. Then there is issue of timing VM start instead of timing usefulactions (it is issue for all languages on VM, not just java) –  Alpedar Nov 30 '11 at 12:02
add comment

So I went and played a bit with this on ideone.org.

Here a slightly modified version of your original C++ program, but with the appending in the loop eliminated, so it only measures the call to std::string::find(). Note that I had to cut the number of iterations to ~40%, otherwise ideone.org would kill the process.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    const std::string::size_type limit = 42 * 1024;
    unsigned int found = 0;

    //std::string s;
    std::string s(limit, 'X');
    for (std::string::size_type i = 0; i < limit; ++i) {
        //s += 'X';
        if (s.find("ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ", 0) != std::string::npos)
            ++found;
    }

    if(found > 0)
        std::cout << "Found " << found << " times!\n";
    std::cout << "x's length = " << s.size() << '\n';

    return 0;
}

My results at ideone.org are time: 3.37s. (Of course, this is highly questionably, but indulge me for a moment and wait for the other result.)

Now we take this code and swap the commented lines, to test appending, rather than finding. Note that, this time, I had increased the number of iterations tenfold in trying to see any time result at all.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    const std::string::size_type limit = 1020 * 1024;
    unsigned int found = 0;

    std::string s;
    //std::string s(limit, 'X');
    for (std::string::size_type i = 0; i < limit; ++i) {
        s += 'X';
        //if (s.find("ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ", 0) != std::string::npos)
        //    ++found;
    }

    if(found > 0)
        std::cout << "Found " << found << " times!\n";
    std::cout << "x's length = " << s.size() << '\n';

    return 0;
}

My results at ideone.org, despite the tenfold increase in iterations, are time: 0s.

My conclusion: This benchmark is, in C++, highly dominated by the searching operation, the appending of the character in the loop has no influence on the result at all. Was that really your intention?

share|improve this answer
3  
@sbi: and that is when one notes than in C++ find is O(N), while in Python indexOf uses Boyer-Moore (as noted by Duncan in a comment). Once again, "batteries included". –  Matthieu M. Nov 29 '11 at 12:56
4  
@Matthieu M.: Boyer-Moore does not gain you anything here, because the first character of the search-for string is not found at all in the search-into string. On the contrary, it may be adding some overhead, needlessly processing the search-for string in every iteration of the loop. –  Mike Nakis Nov 29 '11 at 16:06
1  
Are we sure that string::find(const char*) isn't just implemented in terms of string::find(const string&)? If it was, memory allocations could be expensive here. –  Kylotan Nov 29 '11 at 18:19
    
@Kylotan: I tested both. No visible difference. –  Matthieu M. Nov 29 '11 at 20:34
    
@MikeNakis: Indeed, I tested it and even doing the loop invariant code motion by hand (to move the pattern analysis out of the loop) the boyer-moore search was still slower. Therefore I suspect they use something even trickier, perhaps closer to memmem. –  Matthieu M. Nov 29 '11 at 20:35
show 3 more comments

The idiomatic C++ solution would be:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>

int main()
{
    const int limit = 102 * 1024;
    std::string s;
    s.reserve(limit);

    const std::string pattern("ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ");

    for (int i = 0; i < limit; ++i) {
        s += 'X';
        if (std::search(s.begin(), s.end(), pattern.begin(), pattern.end()) != s.end())
            std::cout << "Omg Wtf found!";
    }
    std::cout << "X's length = " << s.size();
    return 0;
}

I could speed this up considerably by putting the string on the stack, and using memmem -- but there seems to be no need. Running on my machine, this is over 10x the speed of the python solution already..

[On my laptop]

time ./test X's length = 104448 real 0m2.055s user 0m2.049s sys 0m0.001s

share|improve this answer
    
Confirmed. g++ 4.4.3. In my test 5s for search, 12.5s for find (both in the same exe; my test times are longer as I pre-created the string with std::string s(limit,'X'); I.e. search and find had more work to do.) CONCLUSION: stdlib find() on g++ has lots of potential for optimization! –  Darren Cook Dec 1 '11 at 1:15
    
Wow; added a memmem() version, and it is 0.75s (using the same string, accessed via c_str()). (Actually, it was 0; the whole loop seemed to get optimized away; so I added some minor computation to the loop to stop that.) NEW CONCLUSION: find() and search() are doing something weird, that even -O3 cannot optimize, or memmem is using some special CPU feature. Fascinating! –  Darren Cook Dec 1 '11 at 1:35
6  
The reason std::search is faster than std::string::search is the because (by convention?) std::search is implemented in the header which gives the compiler much more room to optimise. std::string::search on the other hand is not. (And because this is calling the function so many times, it makes a big different) –  Heptic Dec 1 '11 at 22:29
1  
@Heptic: Um. std::string is but a typedef for std::basic_string<char>, which is a template, and as such fully implemented in headers. –  sbi Dec 1 '12 at 20:43
add comment

That is the most obvious one: please try to do s.reserve(limit); before main loop.

Documentation is here.

I should mention that direct usage of standard classes in C++ in the same way you are used to do it in Java or Python will often give you sub-par performance if you are unaware of what is done behind the desk. There is no magical performance in language itself, it just gives you right tools.

share|improve this answer
    
On my machine adding s.reserve(limit) before the loop makes no perceptible difference to performance. –  NPE Nov 29 '11 at 11:44
    
I agree with what you are saying in general, but have you tested this? With gcc 4.6 I don't get any speedup when using string::reserve. Can you show how to do the concatenation in a fast way, exploiting the knowledge of how the classes work in the background? –  Szabolcs Nov 29 '11 at 11:48
    
Is that really an issue here? Each string::operator++ is only appending a single character, so memory reallocation and copying shouldn't be a big drain. –  Steve314 Nov 29 '11 at 11:48
1  
Well, checked this in practice. Replacing s += "X" with string s(102*1024, 'X'); made enormous speed improvement ( real 0m0.003s in my VBox ). std::string::reserve not helping though, despite what I have said ( should have had same effect in my opinion though ). Need to investigate a bit more. Edited: lol, only now have paid attention to the way for loop is stated :) ok, rollback everything –  Михаил Страшун Nov 29 '11 at 12:24
1  
Of course building the string made enormous speed improvement. You then bypass the loop completely... You need to change the loop condition to iterate on a i = 0 variable if you allocate the string first, and then you'll notice that the search is the real issue. –  Matthieu M. Nov 29 '11 at 12:58
show 1 more comment

My first thought is that there isn't a problem.

C++ gives second-best performance, nearly ten times faster than Java. Maybe all but Java are running close to the best performance achievable for that functionality, and you should be looking at how to fix the Java issue (hint - StringBuilder).

In the C++ case, there are some things to try to improve performance a bit. In particular...

  • s += 'X'; rather than s += "X";
  • Declare string searchpattern ("ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"); outside the loop, and pass this for the find calls. An std::string instance knows it's own length, whereas a C string requires a linear-time check to determine that, and this may (or may not) be relevant to std::string::find performance.
  • Try using std::stringstream, for a similar reason to why you should be using StringBuilder for Java, though most likely the repeated conversions back to string will create more problems.

Overall, the result isn't too surprising though. JavaScript, with a good JIT compiler, may be able to optimise a little better than C++ static compilation is allowed to in this case.

With enough work, you should always be able to optimise C++ better than JavaScript, but there will always be cases where that doesn't just naturally happen and where it may take a fair bit of knowledge and effort to achieve that.

share|improve this answer
    
The performance is bounded by the find call, not the allocation. For example, testing the 2nd point, there is just not difference (at all). –  Matthieu M. Nov 29 '11 at 13:07
    
@Matthieu - well, I didn't say any of my ideas would definitely make a difference. However, the second point is all about the find call. The point is to use a different overload of find which takes the search pattern as an std::string rather than as a C string, and thus (possibly but not definitely) avoid strlen calls within the find call. Another thought is that since the search pattern is constant, a compiled-pattern approach may work faster (Boyer-Moore string search, for example), but that's cheating - unless e.g. JavaScript optimizers are much smarter than I'd expect. –  Steve314 Nov 29 '11 at 13:55
    
I tested a naive Boyer-Moore (building the table at each step) and it performed worse. The needle is very small (26 characters) compared to the size of the haystack (104448 characters), so the extra complexity balances the speed-up that could be expected. I guess that building the table outside could help... but maybe not as much as expected. –  Matthieu M. Nov 29 '11 at 14:00
1  
Stringstream will not give any performance improvements here. std::string is already mutable and can insert in constant amortized time. –  Billy ONeal Dec 1 '11 at 7:49
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What you are missing here is the inherent complexity of the find search.

You are executing the search 102 * 1024 (104 448) times. A naive search algorithm will, each time, try to match the pattern starting from the first character, then the second, etc...

Therefore, you have a string that is going from length 1 to N, and at each step you search the pattern against this string, which is a linear operation in C++. That is N * (N+1) / 2 = 5 454 744 576 comparisons. I am not as surprised as you are that this would take some time...

Let us verify the hypothesis by using the overload of find that searches for a single A:

Original: 6.94938e+06 ms
Char    : 2.10709e+06 ms

About 3 times faster, so we are within the same order of magnitude. Therefore the use of a full string is not really interesting.

Conclusion ? Maybe that find could be optimized a bit. But the problem is not worth it.

Note: and to those who tout Boyer Moore, I am afraid that the needle is too small, so it won't help much. May cut an order of magnitude (26 characters), but no more.

share|improve this answer
    
There is no A in the hay-stack, so it should just check each character in the string that it is not found and not look at the other characters of the pattern. You seem to be describing find_any_of method, which again should find the 'X' very fast here. –  UncleBens Nov 29 '11 at 17:11
    
@UncleBens: not at all, I am talking about find, which even for a string pattern should stop on the first character of the pattern if it does not match and move on in the haystack. The fact that looking for a single character A (the first character of the pattern) is only 3 times faster confirms my suspicion that it is not the pattern search that is slow, but simply that looking for a pattern in such a long string so many times is plain slow in itself. –  Matthieu M. Nov 29 '11 at 20:32
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For C++, try to use std::string for "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ" - in my implementation string::find(const charT* s, size_type pos = 0) const calculates length of string argument.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried it, and it does not make any difference. –  Mike Nakis Nov 29 '11 at 13:14
add comment

I just tested the C++ example myself. If I remove the the call to std::sting::find, the program terminates in no time. Thus the allocations during string concatenation is no problem here.

If I add a variable sdt::string abc = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ" and replace the occurence of "ABC...XYZ" in the call of std::string::find, the program needs almost the same time to finish as the original example. This again shows that allocation as well as computing the string's length does not add much to the runtime.

Therefore, it seems that the string search algorithm used by libstdc++ is not as fast for your example as the search algorithms of javascript or python. Maybe you want to try C++ again with your own string search algorithm which fits your purpose better.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, if you remove string::find, this is just string concatenation, and this would be no much difference between languages/runtimes optimized for string: string in C++ is also much more optimized than in C (string as an array of char). string::find is not just a test for searching algorithm, but also a test for traversing string. I'll make another test. –  Wu Shu Nov 29 '11 at 14:48
add comment

C/C++ language are not easy and take years make fast programs.

with strncmp(3) version modified from c version:

#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void test()
{
    int limit = 102 * 1024;
    char s[limit];
    size_t size = 0;
    while (size < limit) {
        s[size++] = 'X';
        if (!strncmp(s, "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ", 26)) {
            fprintf(stderr, "zomg\n");
            return;
        }
    }
    printf("x's length = %zu\n", size);
}

int main()
{
    test();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

It seems that in nodejs better algorithm for search substrings. You can implement self and try it.

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add comment

Your test code is checking a pathological scenario of excessive string concatenation. (The string-search part of the test could have probably been omitted, I bet you it contributes almost nothing to the final results.) Excessive string concatenation is a pitfall that most languages warn very strongly against, and provide very well known alternatives for, (i.e. StringBuilder,) so what you are essentially testing here is how badly these languages fail under scenarios of perfectly expected failure. That's pointless.

An example of a similarly pointless test would be to compare the performance of various languages when throwing and catching an exception in a tight loop. All languages warn that exception throwing and catching is abysmally slow. They do not specify how slow, they just warn you not to expect anything. Therefore, to go ahead and test precisely that, would be pointless.

So, it would make a lot more sense to repeat your test substituting the mindless string concatenation part (s += "X") with whatever construct is offered by each one of these languages precisely for avoiding string concatenation. (Such as class StringBuilder.)

share|improve this answer
1  
I have just checked the example code myself, and it turns out that almost all of the runtime is spend during string search. –  swegi Nov 29 '11 at 12:07
    
o_O -- OK, then there is something totally weird going on. Prior to posting my answer I checked the documentation of all the find() and indexOf() methods in all of the above languages to make sure that they all perform straight non-regex, case-sensitive search. So, if search is the problem despite the triviality of the task, I do not know what to say. –  Mike Nakis Nov 29 '11 at 12:19
    
Well, I checked only the C++ example, I think you are right for the really poor performance of the Java example. –  swegi Nov 29 '11 at 12:21
1  
@swegi which languages did you check? I expect it may vary between them. With Python 2.7 the code as written takes 13.1s on my system, removing the find call it takes 0.019s. So the string concatenation (at least on Python) is the irrelevant part of the test. This is probably only true because the C version of Python uses reference counting and can do the concatenation in-place when it can detect that there is only one reference to the string. –  Duncan Nov 29 '11 at 12:31
3  
std::string::operator+= is the construct offered by C++ for avoiding the thing that in Java causes String concatenation to be slow. std::string is a mutable class, same as StringBuilder. TBH I think it's a bit confusing that the question is "why is C++ slow?", but includes Java results that are waaay slower, prompting various people to explain why the Java results are slow. Which is irrelevant to the question ;-) –  Steve Jessop Nov 29 '11 at 12:43
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