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I would like to know why would be a problem if Java would have generics without erasure. I know the issue is compatibility with older libraries but wouldn't that be fine to put Object in place of type where we wouldn't specify it. For example it we have List list = new ArrayList(); could be used as List<Object>-s collection and List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>(); would be as is without erasure.

Could someone please show an example what would happen if erasure wouldn't come into play.

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I'm not sure you understand what type erasure is... –  Matt Ball Nov 29 '11 at 12:12
    
Your question is not clear. Besides, you seem to confuse raw types with reified types. –  helpermethod Nov 29 '11 at 12:12
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3 Answers

That would still have required those old libraries to be recompiled before they could be used on a new JVM - exactly the kind of breaking change that Java's designers have always avoided at all costs.

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of course new Java code wouldn't run on old JVM but it mean that old code wouldn't work on new VM? –  George Nov 29 '11 at 12:24
    
@George: That's what I said, yes. –  Michael Borgwardt Nov 29 '11 at 12:25
    
Yea i knew that new wouldn't on old. it is obvious, pre 1.5 jvms and compilers are not aware of generics but what does it has to do with libs. This is citation for 'Thinking in Java' Without some kind of migration path, all the libraries that had been built up over time stood the chance of being cut off from the developers that chose to move to Java generics. –  George Nov 29 '11 at 12:27
    
Sorry Michael now I got it. Thank you. –  George Nov 29 '11 at 12:39
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One of the best resources you can find to understand Java's generics in general and type erasure in particular is Angelika Langer's FAQ on the topic, take a look at it and all will be clear.

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It was not simply an issue of backwards compatibility, but migration compatibility. As you rightly pointed out, pre-1.5 every list was effectively a List<Object>, thus defining List := List<Object> would have worked and would have been backwards compatible. However, migrating existing libraries to 1.5 and turning the implicit List<Object> into a List<Foo> would break client code. Enter raw types..

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