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SQL1:

select t1.f1,t2.f2 
from t1 
   left join t2 on t1.f1 = t2.f2 and t1.f2=1 and t1.f3=0 

SQL2:

select t1.f1,t2.f2 
from t1 
  left join t2 on t1.f1 = t2.f2 
where t1.f2=1 and t1.f3=0

The difference is where and on clause, is there same return result? and what's the difference ? does DBMS run them in same way? thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Have you read all of them: stackoverflow.com/search?q=join+where? – Michał Powaga Nov 29 '11 at 13:02
    
ok ,I will read it ,I don't know how to express the subject in normal English. – SleeplessKnight Nov 29 '11 at 13:13
    
I explained in brief below in my posts – Somnath Muluk Nov 30 '11 at 8:43
up vote 15 down vote accepted

The where clause applies to the whole resultset; the on clause only applies to the join in question.

In the example supplied, all of the additional conditions related to fields on the inner side of the join - so in this example, the two queries are effectively identical.

However, if you had included a condition on a value in the table in the outer side of the join, it would have made a significant difference.

You can get more from this link: http://ask.sqlservercentral.com/questions/80067/sql-data-filter-condition-in-join-vs-where-clause

For example:

select t1.f1,t2.f2 from t1 left join t2 on t1.f1 = t2.f2 and t2.f4=1

select t1.f1,t2.f2 from t1 left join t2 on t1.f1 = t2.f2 where t2.f4=1

- do different things - the former will left join to t2 records where f4 is 1, while the latter has effectively been turned back into an inner join to t2.

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To complete the picture: if the where clause would reference columns from t2, then it would turn the outer join into an inner join – a_horse_with_no_name Nov 29 '11 at 13:04
    
@a_horse_with_no_name: GMTA. :) – Mark Bannister Nov 29 '11 at 13:10

The first query is quicker than the second one as the join condition is more specific than the second one: it does not makes sense to return records that you will filter with the where clause (it would be better do not return them at all- query1)

Anyway it really depends by the query optimizer.

have a look at the below:

Is a JOIN faster than a WHERE?

share|improve this answer
1  
Not necessarily - it depends on the database's optimiser. Many of them will optimise these to identical queries. – Mark Bannister Nov 29 '11 at 13:03
    
A decent optimizer will most probably create the same execution plan for both statements, so I doubt there will be a performance difference. – a_horse_with_no_name Nov 29 '11 at 13:07
1  
you guys are both right but it really depend by the Optimizer stackoverflow.com/questions/1129923/… – Massimiliano Peluso Nov 29 '11 at 13:10
    
@MassimilianoPeluso: I suggest adding that link to your answer - I think it would make it more useful. – Mark Bannister Nov 29 '11 at 13:16

The relational algebra allows interchangeability of the predicates in the WHERE clause and the INNER JOIN, so even INNER JOIN queries with WHERE clauses can have the predicates rearrranged by the optimizer so that they may already be excluded during the JOIN process.

I recommend you write the queries in the most readble way possible.

Sometimes this includes making the INNER JOIN relatively "incomplete" and putting some of the criteria in the WHERE simply to make the lists of filtering criteria more easily maintainable.

You can get more from this link: http://ask.sqlservercentral.com/questions/80067/sql-data-filter-condition-in-join-vs-where-clause

For example, instead of:

SELECT *
FROM Customers c
INNER JOIN CustomerAccounts ca
    ON ca.CustomerID = c.CustomerID
    AND c.State = 'NY'
INNER JOIN Accounts a
    ON ca.AccountID = a.AccountID
    AND a.Status = 1

Write:

SELECT *
FROM Customers c
INNER JOIN CustomerAccounts ca
    ON ca.CustomerID = c.CustomerID
INNER JOIN Accounts a
    ON ca.AccountID = a.AccountID
WHERE c.State = 'NY'
    AND a.Status = 1

But it depends, of course.

share|improve this answer
    
Most RDBMS products will optimize both queries identically. In "SQL Performance Tuning" by Peter Gulutzan and Trudy Pelzer, they tested multiple brands of RDBMS and found no performance difference. I prefer to keep join conditions separate from query restriction conditions. If you're using OUTER JOIN sometimes it's necessary to put conditions in the join clause. – Somnath Muluk Nov 29 '11 at 13:30

1)

SQL1: select t1.f1,t2.f2 from t1 left join t2 on t1.f1 = t2.f2 **and** t1.f2=1 and t1.f3=0 

In this, parser will check each row of t1 with each row of t2 with these 3 conditions. Getting faster result.

2) SQL2: select t1.f1,t2.f2 from t1 left join t2 on t1.f1 = t2.f2 **where** t1.f2=1 and t1.f3=0

In this, join only take 1st condition and then the result got from join is filtered with those 2 conditions. And will take more time than 1st query.

You can get more from this link: http://ask.sqlservercentral.com/questions/80067/sql-data-filter-condition-in-join-vs-where-clause

share|improve this answer
1  
Any decent optimizer will treat both statements exactly the same way (Oracle and PostgreSQL do) – a_horse_with_no_name Nov 29 '11 at 13:10
    
Essentially the same answer as Massimiliano, and therefore not necessarily true for the same reason. – Mark Bannister Nov 29 '11 at 13:11
    
See Mark's comment above; performance is dependent on the database provider. However, the output should be the same for this example for all modern RDBMS. – Stuart Ainsworth Nov 29 '11 at 13:11
    
Most RDBMS products will optimize both queries identically. In "SQL Performance Tuning" by Peter Gulutzan and Trudy Pelzer, they tested multiple brands of RDBMS and found no performance difference. I prefer to keep join conditions separate from query restriction conditions. If you're using OUTER JOIN sometimes it's necessary to put conditions in the join clause. – Somnath Muluk Nov 29 '11 at 13:31

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