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I have code that has a Map of (Message)Handlers. I'm trying to make the handlers generified (as seen by the interface Handler). Without generics the handlers all need to cast from Object to the respective class, which would be nice to avoid (but everything works). For each message class (Foo below) I have a handler class.

How can I keep a Map of any kind of Class to any kind of Handlers and get/call with "just" an Object? (the parameter to handleMessage(Object) can't be restricted)

See MWE below.

import java.util.*;
public class Logic
{   
    Map<Class<?>, Handler<?>> handlers = new HashMap<Class<?>, Handler<?>>();

    public void run()
    {   
        handlers.put(Foo.class, new FooHandler());
    }   

    public void handleMessage(Object msg)
    {   
        Handler<?> handler = handlers.get(msg.getClass());
        if (handler != null) {
            handler.execute(msg);
        }   
    }   

    private interface Handler<T>
    {   
        public void execute(T msg);
    }   

    private class FooHandler implements Handler<Foo>
    {   
        public void execute(Foo msg) {}
    }   

    private class Foo {}
}

This code produces:

Logic.java:16: execute(capture#x of ?) in Logic.Handler cannot be applied > to (java.lang.Object) handler.execute(msg);

How can this be repaired to work while still keeping the Handler interface generic?

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't define the relationship between the key and the value in a field, but you can use accessor methods to enforce it, provided only these methods are used to access the map.

private final Map<Class, Handler> handlers = new HashMap<Class, Handler>();

public <T> void addHandler(Class<T> clazz, Handler<T> handler) {
    handlers.put(clazz, handler);
}

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public <T> Handler<T> getHandler(Class<T> clazz) {
    return (Handler<T>) handlers.get(clazz);
}

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public <T> Handler<T> getHandlerFor(T t) {
    return getHandler((Class<T>) t.getClass());
}

public void run()    {
    addHandler(Foo.class, new FooHandler());
}

public <T> void handleMessage(T msg) {
    Handler<T> handler = getHandlerFor(msg);
    if (handler != null) {
        handler.execute(msg);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer led me to type safe heterogeneous containers, relationships for generics types and whatnot! I'm a bit disappointed that it's impossible without wrapper methods and @SuppressWarnings however :<. Still, it works now, but I don't know if it's worth the hassle of introducing generics here. –  Jonas WS Nov 29 '11 at 14:10
    
The problem is how complicated do you want the generic syntax to be. ;) Its will check calls to addHandler, hetHandler and getHandlerFor are correct. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 29 '11 at 14:23
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The problem is that execute() takes a certain parameter type, that is more specific than Object.

However, in your handleMessage() method, the compiler doesn't know what type the parameter is. Suppose a case where FooHandler is registered for class Bar (which would be possible).

In that context handler.execute(msg); would actually result in FooHandler#execute(Foo) being called with a Bar argument, which would result in a ClassCastException (unless Bar extends Foo). Thus the compiler refuses to compile that code.

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Good point there! –  Jonas WS Nov 29 '11 at 13:37
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Another answer that wasn't here but it should be - remove all of the generics syntax (i.e. remove all the ). Then the parser will revert to JDK1.4 syntax and this will all work fine.

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