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I want to create a html file with a Java applet for my database. The Java code works fine in the applet viewer and I've used a JDBC jar file for SQL connectivity.

What I can't do, is to link these two and embed them onto a html file. How do I do it?

My WelcomApplet class has 6 other classes in the same file which I've used for Swing.

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Just a tip: accessing database directly from your applet is usually a very bad practice giving you a lots of security vulnerabilities. If you need to access database from an Applet, usually you do Applet<->WebService<->DB kind of communication. –  Max Nov 29 '11 at 13:35
    
What is the HTML & Java code? What is the URL of the page when it cannot access the DB? What output do you get in the Java Console? Without all this information, by what process do you expect us to find a solution, Voodoo? –  Andrew Thompson Nov 30 '11 at 0:09
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2 Answers

Due to the limited privileges available in java applets, it's generally a lot easier to use a three-tier system (applet talks to application server which talks to database through JDBC) rather than a two-tier system (applet talks to database).

Don't get me wrong, I think it's possible to talk directly if you grant certain permissions to the applet, but three-tier is more prevalent for web applets.

See http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/rbhelp/v6r3/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.redbrick.doc6.3%2Fciacg%2Fciacg35.htm.

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Creating the 3-tier system has nothing to do with "the limited privileges available in java applets" and everything to do with DB security. A sand-boxed applet can connect to a DB on the home server. A trusted applet can connect to any DB that accepts connections. –  Andrew Thompson Nov 30 '11 at 0:06
    
Fair enough. I'm relatively new to Java and my lecture notes imply it's a permissions issue. Either way, a 3-tier system seems to be the way to go. –  Chris Parton Nov 30 '11 at 1:06
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If I understood you right, you need to write several *.jar files in "ARCHIVE" attribute of an "APPLET" tag.

For example:

<applet
    codebase = "."
    archive = "test.jar,spring.jar,jdbc.jar,etc.jar"
    code = "applet.Applet1"
    name = "Applet"
    width = "100"
    height = "100" >
</applet>
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actually no,,, i have 1 welcomeApplet class,,, in it, i've used swings , i have 6 classes inside the welcomeapplet class!! there is no main function!! and there is 1 external jar file that has been imported in the eclipse add external jar's window!! –  Rutwikam Nov 29 '11 at 13:34
    
Upload that jar file (lets call it other.jar) together with your applet jar (lets call it applet.jar). Then when you put it to html, write archive = "applet.jar, other.jar" –  Max Nov 29 '11 at 13:37
    
1) code = "applet.Applet1.class" should be code = "applet.Applet1" 2) An applet needs the width & height attributes. –  Andrew Thompson Nov 30 '11 at 1:12
    
Fixed, copied that code from some tutorial and didn't notice that mistakes. –  Max Nov 30 '11 at 10:17
    
there's only 1 applet!! and i m unable to create jar files for my code!! :( dont know why!! i m using eclipse!! –  Rutwikam Nov 30 '11 at 13:18
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