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I wrote a little program using fork to create new processes which use pipes to communicate. Applying defensive programming, I check every return value. If a return value indicates that something went wrong, I want to free all resources, close all pipes and the parent process to wait on it's child processes to terminate. Now, what's the best way to bail out if an error occurs?

At the moment, I'm doing it this way:

    /* initialize pipes */
if(pipe(p1fd) == -1) {
    (void) printError("Could not init pipe 1");
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}
if(pipe(p2fd) == -1) {
    (void) printError("Could not init pipe 2");
    (void) close(p1fd[0]);
    (void) close(p1fd[1]); 
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}

switch (pid = fork()) {
    case -1: 
        (void) printError("Could not fork");
        (void) close(p1fd[0]);
        (void) close(p1fd[1]);
        (void) close(p2fd[0]);
        (void) close(p2fd[1]);  
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        break;
    case 0: /* child process */
        break;
    default: /* parent process */       
        break;
}   

This gets quite cumbersome if one needs more resources. Another way I thought of was providing a bailout function that simply closes all pipes without caring if the pipes have actually been opened (same for freeing memory and calling wait on child processes). But then, all variables needed in such a bail out function would have to be global, since some of the pipes are passed on to different child processes/functions.

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2  
goto is your friend. –  Blagovest Buyukliev Nov 29 '11 at 13:46
    
@mort: You don't check any return value of close () system call. Neither you expect exit () not to exit :-) –  user405725 Nov 29 '11 at 13:50
    
@Vlad: Well, exit()does not have a return value. –  mort Nov 29 '11 at 13:54
    
@mort: But in theory, it could not do the job, right? So that next line of code, if any, could get executed. I'd add _exit () after that, and then call die () in a loop to make it defensive :)) –  user405725 Nov 29 '11 at 13:55
1  
@VladLazarenko: exit does not have a return value, it also doesn't return. the gcc optimizer will eliminate any code following exit for this reason. –  Hasturkun Nov 29 '11 at 14:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use goto to avoid repeating the same code in each of the failure branches:

if (pipe(p1fd) == -1) {
    printError("Could not init pipe 1");
    goto pipe1_fail;
}

if (pipe(p2fd) == -1) {
    printError("Could not init pipe 2");
    goto pipe2_fail;
}

switch (pid = fork()) {
    case -1: 
        printError("Could not fork");
        goto fork_fail;

    case 0: /* child process */
        ...
        exit(...);

    default: /* parent process */       
        ...
        exit(...);
}

fork_fail:
close(p2fd[0]);
close(p2fd[1]);

pipe2_fail:
close(p1fd[0]);
close(p1fd[1]);

pipe1_fail:
exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
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Although goto is frowned upon by some people, it is often used for error handling, e. g. in the Linux kernel. But be careful to keep your code well-structured then, and don't exaggerate in using this.

Example here:

/* initialize pipes */
if(pipe(p1fd) == -1) {
    (void) printError("Could not init pipe 1");
    goto error;
}

if(pipe(p2fd) == -1) {
    (void) printError("Could not init pipe 2");
    goto closep1fd;
}

switch (pid = fork()) {
    case -1: 
        (void) printError("Could not fork");
        goto closep2p1fd;
    case 0: /* child process */
        break;
    default: /* parent process */       
        break;
}   

closep2p1fd:
    close(p2fd[0]);
    close(p2fd[1]); 
closep1fd:
    close(p1fd[0]);
    close(p1fd[1]); 
error:
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    return -1; // maybe better if it is a deeply nested function
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