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I'm fairly new to Java so forgive me for asking what may appear to be a stupid question.

I am writing a simple 'user login' program. To check whether the username and password match, I could either use a simple boolean variable or use a boolean method and return the value as true or false.

public boolean match() {
    if(userField.getText().equals(testUser)&&passField.getText().equals(testPass))
        return true;
    else
        return false;
}

Above is a very simple example of using a boolean method.

My question is, as a rule of thumb, what is the more favourable thing to use, a boolean method or a variable? I understand that this might be more of a personal preference thing for the programmer but I don't understand why you would choose one over the other.

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Thank you all for your fast and helpful replies! –  Jake Nov 29 '11 at 14:23

8 Answers 8

  1. Use a method so subclasses could override and define their own matching.
  2. You should always keep fields/member variables private and give access to them via methods.

Ideally you should abstract out the match method in to an interface and have implementations override the match() method

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I don't think you're answering the the question that the OP is asking... –  Matt Ball Nov 29 '11 at 14:13
    
@MДΓΓБДLL I believe its not just about answering, its about helping him one level beyond by telling him best-practices. –  Suraj Chandran Nov 29 '11 at 14:18
1  
I think you are answering the question. (It's worded badly, so there's room for debate.) I read it as, "Should I return the result from a method, or store it in a member variable?" –  erickson Nov 29 '11 at 14:26
    
"I believe its not just about answering, its about helping him one level beyond " I agree so i add up to that the following: Also use one return statement in the method as a good practice to make the code more readable. –  Pitelk Nov 29 '11 at 14:43

In that case, you should absolutely rewrite it like so:

public boolean match() {
    return userField.getText().equals(testUser)
        && passField.getText().equals(testPass);
}
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5  
I don't know how this answers the question. –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 29 '11 at 14:23
    
The question is unclear. I interpreted it as asking about returning a simple boolean variable vs. a boolean-valued statement. –  Matt Ball Nov 30 '11 at 4:34

ALT 1: Return the boolean value

PRO: This is good to skip further parts of code that is not necessary to run.

CON: This adds more than one return point and should only be used in methods with only a few lines.

public boolean match() {
   if(!userField.getText().equals(testUser)
      && !passField.getText().equals(testPass)){
     return false;
   }
   //do additional stuff here if user matches
   return true;
}

ALT 2: Return a variable

PRO: This is good in longer method where the return variable can be changed several places.

CON: You typically do this when you have methods that are doing more than one thing and your code lack separation of concerns.

public boolean match() {
   boolean result;
   if(...){
       if(userField.getText().equals(testUser)&&passField.getText().equals(testPass))
          result = true;
       else if (...)
          result = false;
       else if (...)
          result = true;
   } 

   //do something
   if (...)
       result = true;
   else 
       result = false;
   } 
   return result;
}

ALT 3: Return the output of a function or a set of functions

PRO: This is good to save code lines

CON: For readability you should rename the method to tell what this method is actually is doing.

public boolean authenticate(user) {
   return userField.getText().equals(testUser)&&passField.getText().equals(testPass));
}
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It depends on the readability and reusability of the code you're writing. In your case, I'd prefer using a method. If you're using chained methods and boolean logic like you're using, use a method for readability. The JVM will probably inline the call anyway, so there won't be a performance hit.Things I would change are the use of the if statement and the naming to better reflect the purpose of the methode (and using JavaBean naming conventions). Your code could then be easily simplified into this:

public boolean isCorrectUserAndPassword() {
    return userField.getText().equals(testUser) && passField.getText().equals(testPass));
}
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Depends upon business your are working on, if calculation needs to be done, use function, otherwise use a variable.

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We generally use methods because were doing something repeatedly. In this case your going to be checking if the password and username match and you will be doing this repeatedly throughout your program. So I would use a method because accessing the boolean variable maybe difficult and may become messy. So I suggest using a method in cases where you are doing something repeatedly (and when it is a procedure) and using variables as apart of a procedure but not as the prodcedure.

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Ideally Its actually better code re-use if you use a boolean method ,

because you can use the same match method many times and may be even for many purposes

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A variable adds a property to a class (unless it's local), whereas a method adds a reusable behavior. Even though it does not make sense to compare variable and method, rule of thumb is - use variable to hold value and method to execute a bunch of related statements.

In your case, every time you call the match method, it don't just return a boolean value but also performs some checks before it returns either true or false. But, if it were a boolean variable, it would only be able hold a boolean value of true or false, but could not execute any statements.

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