Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm starting to learn Assembler and I'm working in Unix. I want to open a file and write 'Hello world' on it.

section.data

textoutput db 'Hello world!', 10
lentext equ $ - textoutput
filetoopen db 'hi.txt'

section .text
global _start

_start:

mov eax, 5            ;open
mov ebx, filetoopen
mov ecx, 2            ;read and write mode
int 80h

mov eax, 4
mov ebx, filetoopen   ;I'm not sure what do i have to put here, what is the "file descriptor"?
mov ecx, textoutput
mov edx, lentext

mov eax, 1
mov ebx, 0
int 80h              ; finish without errors

But when I compile it, it doesn't do anything. What am I doing wrong? When I open a file where does the file descriptor value return to?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is x86 Linux (x86 is not the only assembly language, and Linux is not the only Unix!)...

section .data

textoutput db 'Hello world!', 10
lentext equ $ - textoutput
filetoopen db 'hi.txt'

The filename string requires a 0-byte terminator: filetoopen db 'hi.txt', 0

section .text
global _start

_start:

mov eax, 5            ;open
mov ebx, filetoopen
mov ecx, 2            ;read and write mode

2 is the O_RDWR flag for the open syscall. If you want the file to be created if it doesn't already exist, you will need the O_CREAT flag as well; and if you specify O_CREAT, you need a third argument which is the permissions mode for the file. If you poke around in the C headers, you'll find that O_CREAT is defined as 0100 - beware of the leading zero: this is an octal constant! You can write octal constants in nasm using the o suffix.

So you need something like mov ecx, 0102o to get the right flags and mov edx, 0666o to set the permssions.

int 80h

The return code from a syscall is passed in eax. Here, this will be the file descriptor (if the open succeeded) or a small negative number, which is a negative errno code (e.g. -1 for EPERM). Note that the convention for returning error codes from a raw syscall is not quite the same as the C syscall wrappers (which generally return -1 and set errno in the case of an error)...

mov eax, 4
mov ebx, filetoopen   ;I'm not sure what do i have to put here, what is the "file descriptor"?

...so here you need to mov ebx, eax first (to save the open result before eax is overwritten) then mov eax, 4. (You might want to think about checking that the result was positive first, and handling the failure to open in some way if it isn't.)

mov ecx, textoutput
mov edx, lentext

Missing int 80h here.

mov eax, 1
mov ebx, 0
int 80h              ; finish without errors
share|improve this answer
2  
Great answer! I just wanted to mention that the flags for open can be found in /usr/include/bits/fcntl.h on debian/ubuntu, here's a gist of the constants –  Zhanger Jul 17 '13 at 17:11

It depends what assembler you are using and if you expect to be using the C runtime or not. In this case which appears to be the Hello World text example from rosettacode they are using nasm. Given you have a _start field you are not needing the C runtime so you assemble this to an elf object file and link it into a program:

nasm -felf hello.asm
ld hello.o -o hello

Now you can run the hello program.

A slightly more portable example that uses the C runtime to do the work rather than linux syscalls might look like the sample below. If you link this as described it can use printf to do the printing.

;;; helloworld.asm -
;;;
;;; NASM code for Windows using the C runtime library
;;;
;;; For windows - change printf to _printf and then:
;;;   nasm -fwin32 helloworld.asm
;;;   link -subsystem:console -out:helloworld.exe -nodefaultlib -entry:main
;;;       helloworld.obj msvcrt.lib
;;; For gcc (linux, unix etc):
;;;   nasm -felf helloworld.asm
;;;   gcc -o helloworld helloworld.o

        extern printf

        section .data
message:
        db 'Hello, World', 10, 0

        section .text
        global main
main:
        push    dword message   ; push function parameters
        call    printf          ; call C library function
        add     esp, 4          ; clean up the stack
        mov     eax, 0          ; exit code 0
        ret

For information about file descriptors - read the open(2) manual page or look at wikipedia. It is how posix refers to an open i/o stream. In your case, stdout.

share|improve this answer

Did you read the Linux Assembly HOWTO? It covers your question.

You can also compile some C code with gcc -S -fverbose-asm -O1 and look at the generated assembly.

At last, I don't think it is worth bothering a lot about assembler. The compiler will surely generate better code than what you could write.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.