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How do I return an invalid object back to the user when he asks for elements outside of the boundary in a container. I don't to throw exceptions.

I coded up my own template hash table

template <class Type1, class Type2> class wqHashTable
{

    public:
    template <class Type1, class Type2> 
        Type2& wqHashTable<Type1, Type2>::operator[](int idx) const
        {
            if (goodId(idx))
            {
                return m_pValue[idx];
            }
            else
            {
                Type2* tValue = new Type2[1];   //TODO: How do we handle errors?

                return tValue[0];
            }
        }
    }
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Can't you return null? – Mike Kwan Nov 29 '11 at 14:35
3  
null reference? – Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 29 '11 at 14:36
    
No gives me compiler error – Damian Nov 29 '11 at 14:47
    
Null references are possible (using ugly hacks), however this is not the case, as the returned object is copied anyway. – Griwes Nov 29 '11 at 14:49
    
Return NULL Object. But for that you need to restrict all types to be derived from an Object Class just like Java or MFC – Abhijit Nov 30 '11 at 3:43

If you don't like exceptions (for whatever obscure reason, you should really use them here), try Boost.Optional.

boost::optional<Type2&> operator[](int idx) const
{
    if(good_idx(idx)
      return boost::optional<Type2&>(m_pValue[idx]);
    return boost::optional<Type2&>(); // uninitialized
}

Calling code:

boost::optional<the_type&> opt_ret = your_table[idx];
if(ret){
  the_type& ret = *opt_ret; // for convenience
  // valid idx, use ret
}

Or you could follow the design of std::vector and just return m_pValue[idx], wether it is good or bad, and provide a .at(int idx) method that does boundary checking (and throws an exception if the check fails).

All in all, there really is no reason to not use exceptions. Other answers already elaborated on that.

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Unfortunately, there's lots of people and companies that do not use exceptions: google-styleguide.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/… – Mooing Duck Nov 29 '11 at 17:13
    
Uh, I had no idea that such a big company doesn't use one of most elegant error handling systems. Blame them. – Griwes Nov 29 '11 at 20:04
2  
@Griwes: Google's certainly to blame for not using exceptions and RAII, aswell as writing exception safe code from the get-go, but with a large legacy codebase, it's certainly hard to introduce exceptions. Still, the rework would be worth it, with RAII and stuff.. – Xeo Nov 29 '11 at 20:08

I would recommend throwing an exception, because anything else will complicate the flow of control in user code (or be ignored and lead to unexpected results). If there is an impending reason not to use exceptions, then the next thing would be implementing the Null Object Pattern (i.e. have a static null object whose reference you return to the user when you cannot return a real object).

The problem with the Null Object Pattern in this particular case is that unless you create a separate derived type (cumbersome, not the role of a container but could fit a bigger design for the application) the object will be undistinguishable from any valid object and you will be forcing users into checking the address of the object bound by the reference, which means that you are back with the alternative of returning a pointer (which can be nulled itself, with no need to provide a Null Object).

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Either throw (IDK why you don't want to do it) or return NULL;.

Another option would be to have some field like ".thisIsErrorObject" in returned type; this way, you could construct objects being error codes themselves.

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Being able to give strong guarantees about not throwing excpetions can greatly simplify client code in a number of situations. – jbat100 Nov 29 '11 at 14:39
2  
@jbat100: The caller will need to handle the error anyway in this case, and it is no different handling an exception than a returned value. In most cases, code should provide the strong exception safety guarantee, and very few times, few parts of the code must offer the no throw guarantee. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 29 '11 at 14:44

If you don't want to throw exceptions, you need to know what you want to do. You may, for instance, want to have a predefined member to return the reference to in case of out-of-boundaries. I do not think you want to do any new here, but then again, it depends on your intentions.

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I would assert(goodId(idx)); and return m_pValue[idx];.

It is a bit strange, how the user is supposed to know the index in the storage. If it is for internal use for something, assertion might be absolutely adequate.

Otherwise, perhaps use the designs of standard associative containers?

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Is there any specific reason why you feel we should use assert if this was a production code? – Abhijit Nov 30 '11 at 3:38
template <class Type1, class Type2> class wqHashTable
{
    Type2 INVALID_ELEMENT;
public:
    bool last_access_valid;

    template <class Type1, class Type2> 
    Type2& wqHashTable<Type1, Type2>::operator[](int idx) const
    {
        last_access_valid = goodId(idx);
        if (last_access_valid )
            return m_pValue[idx];
        else 
            return INVALID_ELEMENT;
    }
}

This requires Type2 to be default constructable, which isn't a guarantee you will always have, but it's pretty common. The caller can check the value of last_access_valid.

If you're going to use a last_access_valid thing like this, I strongly recommend a class like I posted at http://stackoverflow.com/a/8088357/845092 to guarantee with an assert that it gets checked each time, so you cannot accidentally forget. In this case the type of last_access_valid would be ForceCheckError<bool>, and if the caller didn't check it, it would assert.

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