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The Setup


I have two tables, USERS and PETS.

each user has an ID, a NAME, and a flag HAS_PETS, which is 1 if the user owns at least one pet, and 0 otherwise.

Each pet has an ID, a NAME, and an OWNER_ID. Here is the creation script:

create table USERS(
ID NUMBER(*,0),
NAME VARCHAR2(50 BYTE),
HAS_PETS NUMBER(1,0),
CONSTRAINT "XPKUSERS" PRIMARY KEY ("ID")
);

create table PETS(
ID NUMBER(*,0),
NAME VARCHAR2(50 BYTE),
OWNER_ID NUMBER(*,0),
CONSTRAINT "XPKPETS" PRIMARY KEY ("ID")
);

insert into USERS values(0, 'Alice', 0);
insert into USERS values(1, 'Bob', 1);
insert into USERS values(2, 'Carol', 0);

insert into PETS values(0, 'Fido', 1);
insert into PETS values(1, 'Spot', 1);
insert into PETS values(2, 'Xerxes', 2);

The Problem


At one point, many pets were added to PETS, but the OWNER table's HAS_PETS flag was not updated. In the sample data above, Carol owns Xerxes, but her flag is 0.

I want to write a statement which will set HAS_PETS to true if the owner has a pet. With the above data, it should set Carol's HAS_PETS flag to 1. I tried this:

update (
select * 
from USERS a join PETS b 
on a.HAS_PETS = 0 and a.ID = b.OWNER_ID
)
set HAS_PETS = 1 

but it gives an error, cannot modify a column which maps to a non key-preserved table. Oracle recommends that I Modify the underlying base tables directly, but I can't identify which rows need updating unless I do this join.

Googling around prompted me to try this alternative syntax:

update a
set a.HAS_PETS = 1
from USERS a join PETS b 
on a.HAS_PETS = 0 and a.ID = b.OWNER_ID

but it gives an error, SQL command not properly ended, and Wikipedia says "Some databases allow the non-standard use of the FROM clause", leading me to believe this isn't supported by Oracle.

The Questions

  • What is the meaning of the first error? HAS_PETS belongs to USERS, which has a primary key. I don't see any non key-preserved tables here.
  • How can I modify my statement so that it executes the way I expect it to?
share|improve this question
    
I realize that this is probably not a real-world problem, but it's worth pointing out that this is generally considered a poor design. Adding a flag that indicates that child records exist is a de-normalization: if you simply check the child record when you need that information, your problem doesn't exist. – Allan Nov 29 '11 at 20:05
    
@Allan, the tables do exist, although I changed the names to anonymize them. The reason the flag exists is that the .Net front end uses NHibernate to lazy-load User objects. If we access the User's Pet collection, Hibernate must perform an additional query. Accessing the flag requires no additional work. (Or at least that appears to be the reasoning of the original developer) – Kevin Nov 29 '11 at 20:18
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could try

UPDATE a SET HAS_PETS = 1
WHERE ID IN 
    (SELECT DISTINCT OWNER_ID FROM b) p

It could be faster using your additional condition (thanks to @jadarnel27 to noticed that)

UPDATE a SET HAS_PETS = 1
WHERE HAS_PETS = 0 
  AND ID IN 
    (SELECT DISTINCT OWNER_ID FROM b) p
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm...it looks like you missed one of the WHERE conditions (a.HAS_PETS = 0). And, you didn't answer the OPs question about the error message =/. And, you mistyped UPDATE – jadarnel27 Nov 29 '11 at 15:16
    
@jadarnel27: I'm not an Oracle guru, so I can't answer OP first question. Second query corrected and I think the condition you're mentioning is unuseful... just make query faster, but it's not needed. Thanks for your suggestion! :) – Marco Nov 29 '11 at 15:22
    
+1, I didn't think about that fact that the additional condition was more of an optimization than a requirement - good point =) – jadarnel27 Nov 29 '11 at 15:29

According to the Oracle documentation, a key-preserved table is one where the key of the table is preserved in the join.

In this example, the PETS table is key preserve but the USERS table is not. This is because each USER may have more than one PET and therefore the primary key of the USERS table could occur multiple times in the result set.

Because the PETS table is key preserved, you could use the update join syntax to (for example) update the PETS table with the USER's name but you can't update the USERS table with information from PETS.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the informative link and explanation! I really should stop asking multi-part questions, as different people answer different parts and it becomes hard to decide who to give the green checkmark to. Marco gets the check since he solved my practical problem, but please accept this +1 for explaining my theoretical problem. – Kevin Nov 29 '11 at 16:25
    
I like using this form of update but there are so many restrictions that it can be hard to get it right. Thanks to your question, I've now got a good understanding of what a key-preserved table is too. – Mike Meyers Nov 29 '11 at 17:32

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