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In the following code Visual Studio puts an error message on the word else. The specific error reads "Unexpected 'else'". What have I done wrong?

            decimal AmountToAccrue;
            string BillingDescription;


            if (PromoPeriodEnd >= day)

                AmountToAccrue = 0;
                BillingDescription = "Subscription 30-day Promotional Period";

            else

                AmountToAccrue = subscription.Amount * ProratedPercentDue;
                BillingDescription = "Subscription Fee";
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1  
From the looks of it, I'd say you must have a python background. C# wants brackets around blocks. –  Chris Nov 29 '11 at 15:07
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5 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You must use curly braces when you have multi-line if's and else's:

if (PromoPeriodEnd >= day)
{
    AmountToAccrue = 0;
    BillingDescription = "Subscription 30-day Promotional Period";
}
else
{
    AmountToAccrue = subscription.Amount * ProratedPercentDue;
    BillingDescription = "Subscription Fee";
}

Additional Information:

Without curly braces only the next statement, not line, is considered within the scope.

OK:

if (PromoPeriodEnd >= day)
    AmountToAccrue = 0;
else
    AmountToAccrue = subscription.Amount * ProratedPercentDue;

Not OK:

if (PromoPeriodEnd >= day)
    AmountToAccrue = 0;
    BillingDescription = "Subscription 30-day Promotional Period";
else
    AmountToAccrue = subscription.Amount * ProratedPercentDue;
    BillingDescription = "Subscription Fee";

The "Not OK" example would be viewed by the compiler like this:

//Begin if statement
if (PromoPeriodEnd >= day)
    AmountToAccrue = 0;
//End if statement   

//Set BillingDescription  (outside of the else scope)
BillingDescription = "Subscription 30-day Promotional Period";

//Begin else statement - ERROR! Where is the matching if?
else
    AmountToAccrue = subscription.Amount * ProratedPercentDue;

//Set BillingDescription(outside of the else scope) - error above - never reached
BillingDescription = "Subscription Fee";
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2  
+1 For a good explanation to a beginner. –  Fischermaen Nov 29 '11 at 15:06
    
Thanks. Just curious, are the examples on this page incorrect blackwasp.co.uk/CSharpVariableScopes.aspx? They seem to have followed the exact same syntax as I used. I actually previously had the curly braces in my code and then was trying to omit them to make my variables in-scope outside of the if/else statements. –  hughesdan Nov 29 '11 at 15:10
    
@hughesdan, the examples are correct. See above it - it may help clarify the difference. –  James Hill Nov 29 '11 at 15:15
1  
Thanks @JamesHill. I understand now. +1 for the additional info. –  hughesdan Nov 29 '11 at 15:19
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You need curly braces because you have a compound statement for the if and else bodies.

        if (PromoPeriodEnd >= day)
        {
            AmountToAccrue = 0;
            BillingDescription = "Subscription 30-day Promotional Period";
        }
        else
        {
            AmountToAccrue = subscription.Amount * ProratedPercentDue;
            BillingDescription = "Subscription Fee";
        }

The next statement after an if condition is what gets executed if the condition is true. This can either be one statement, or a compound statement (a series of statements enclosed in curly braces).

Because you don't have curly braces, it is interpreting it as:

        if (PromoPeriodEnd >= day)
            AmountToAccrue = 0;    // This is the body of the if

        // this is outside of the if
        BillingDescription = "Subscription 30-day Promotional Period";

        // this token makes no sense here because it is not after the if body.
        else

            AmountToAccrue = subscription.Amount * ProratedPercentDue;

        BillingDescription = "Subscription Fee";

This is actually why many coding standards recommend always using curly braces with control statements, so that if it is changed from a one-statement body to a compound statement body later, this type of error won't arise.

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When you don't use braces, it only recognizes the first statement... so your code becomes this

if (PromoPeriodEnd >= day) {
    AmountToAccrue = 0;
}
BillingDescription = "Subscription 30-day Promotional Period";
else {
    AmountToAccrue = subscription.Amount * ProratedPercentDue;
}
BillingDescription = "Subscription Fee";

Which of course is not what its expecting and to even a novice is quite silly :)

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Seems you lack some brackets:

        if (PromoPeriodEnd >= day)
        {
            AmountToAccrue = 0;
            BillingDescription = "Subscription 30-day Promotional Period";
        }
        else
        {
            AmountToAccrue = subscription.Amount * ProratedPercentDue;
            BillingDescription = "Subscription Fee";
        }

In C#, as in most (all?) C-languages, those curly brackets define code blocks. These code blocks are very important - they also define variable scope (see Eric's comment), so be sure you understand them.

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1  
Note that blocks define scope -- the region of text in which the entity may be referred to by name -- but they do not necessarily define lifetime -- the period of time in which the storage location is valid. First off, the lifetime of a closed-over outer variable of a lambda may extend beyond the time that control is in the scope. And the same with locals in an iterator or async block. Second, the optimizer is permitted to make the lifetimes of locals longer or shorter than control is in the scope. You cannot safely equate scope with lifetime. –  Eric Lippert Nov 29 '11 at 15:44
    
@EricLippert: Thanks for pointing that out. Fixed my response. –  mnemosyn Nov 29 '11 at 16:44
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for multiline you should use brackets

        if (PromoPeriodEnd >= day){

            AmountToAccrue = 0;
            BillingDescription = "Subscription 30-day Promotional Period";
            }
        else {

            AmountToAccrue = subscription.Amount * ProratedPercentDue;
            BillingDescription = "Subscription Fee";
            }
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