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I saw an interesting blank page today titled "saml post profile intersite transit."

  • What is SAML?
  • What was it created for?
  • What is it commonly used for?
  • What was the page I mentioned above all about?
  • What functions does it provide that it's rarely used for but are otherwise interesting?
  • Is there something better or other technology that competes with it?
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Please edit/add/suggest tags as appropriate. –  Adam Davis May 6 '09 at 19:36
3  
Yes, yes, easy enough to google, but it's an enterprise solution to, among other things, the single sign on problem. Enterprise language is used to describe it in most articles (even wikipedia) and so it'd be nice to have an entry on SO that not only broke it down in simpler terms, but was more complete considering a programming audience, whereas most other resources are either mixed audiences, or executives - not implementers. –  Adam Davis May 6 '09 at 19:48
    
LOL - Adam, I wasn't really digging at you seriously, I just found the humour in the fact that if someone with 1 rep point had posted that, everyone would've jumped down their throat. I posted the LMGTFY link in good humour. –  BenAlabaster May 6 '09 at 19:55
    
I understand, and it made me smile, but hopefully others won't see those two and go, "nah, not worth my time to answer..." –  Adam Davis May 6 '09 at 20:01
    
I voted you up, usually the posts with the good content rise to the top ahead of the links anyway. –  BenAlabaster May 6 '09 at 20:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Is there something better or other technology that competes with it?

Relationship between OpenID and SAML

http://connectid.blogspot.com/2006/11/we-need-iiw-in-panama.html

I think OpenID and SAML have successfully found the right (but different) mixes of promiscuity and security. OpenID has focussed on promiscuous providers with an appropriate level of security, SAML on the opposite pairing. This is shown graphically below. Along the horizontal is SP selectivity (the opposite of promiscuity), along the vertical a measure of security.

http://i288.photobucket.com/albums/ll164/stienman/openidvssaml.jpg

So while they are related in that they both attempt to solve the single sign on issue, they really do target and support two different markets.

Would be nice if one solution covered all the bases though.

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Your image is broken. :( –  Robert S. May 6 '09 at 19:46
1  
aw! I'll rehost it... –  Adam Davis May 6 '09 at 19:49
    
@OIS: Better...? –  Adam Davis May 6 '09 at 19:52
    
Looks better for me –  BenAlabaster May 6 '09 at 19:54
2  
Where would OAuth fit in here? –  Jason Axelson Dec 21 '10 at 18:55

I was part of the OASIS community (through my former employer) during the creation of SAML. Simply put, SAML is an XML-based format for sharing security credentials across domains. SAML was created to solve the problem of SSO between service providers in SOA.

We used SAML, including our own C# implementation, to provide the authorization/authentication scheme for a set of business services and infrastructure services used by several of our larger customers. We created a web services accelerator and service-oriented platform for using these services, and SAML drove the security.

That's oversimplifying a bit, of course.

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The comment about "back in the heyday of SOA makes it sound a little like the relevance of SAML may have past. I don't think that's the case. I've seen SAML used (along with other options) as part of a few of the "cloud computing" efforts. One example of this is the security services part of Microsoft's Azure work. As you say, SAML was designed for identity federation and so the more we have mixed party distributed systems - the more that becomes an issue. –  sfitts May 13 '09 at 14:24
    
You're right...what I meant by that was that SAML emerged in the heyday of SOA. I'll edit my answer. –  Robert S. May 13 '09 at 18:20

Here you go

Security Assertion Markup Language

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