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I have a Dog object, and each Dog has a colour and a photoUrl, which is where its photo is on the internet.

class Dog {
     private String colour;
     private String photoUrl;
     private Bitmap photo;

     public Dog(String colour, String photoUrl){
         this.colour = colour;
         this.photoUrl = photoUrl;
     }
}

I want to download the photo and store it on disk. Should I implement the download functionality in Dog.download() or elsewhere, say in a new class called FileDownloader? Is there a design pattern for this problem?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ok several answers so far. But, I have some comments:

  1. I don't think downloading a file is a cross-cutting concern. Security, logging, etc are
  2. "Downloadable" is a poor abstraction. Something better may be "Resource" or similar (like Spring has).
  3. Extending an abstract super class is not a good idea in this class. I don't think a Dog IS A "Downloadable" or similar.
  4. Using something like "setDownloader(Downloader downloader)" makes your class mutable. Unless you require such behavior, I'd recommend to make it immutable.

So, probably a good idea is to copy some of the spring concepts regarding this. See: http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.0.6.RELEASE/spring-framework-reference/html/resources.html

class Dog {
    private final String color;
    private final Photo photo;

    public Dog(final String color, final Photo photo) {
        this.color = color;
        this.photo = photo;
    }
}

class Photo {

    private final Resource resource;

    public Photo(final String path) throws MalformedURLException {
        this.resource = new UrlResource(path);
    }

    public String getUrl() {
        return resource.getUrl();
    }

    public Bitmap getBitmap() {
        final InputStream is = resource.getInputStream();
        // transform is to Bitmap
        // cache the result
        return bitmap;
    }

}

class UrlResource implements Resource {
    private final URL url;

    public UrlResource(final String path) throws MalformedURLException {
        Assert.notNull(path, "Path must not be null");
        this.url = new URL(path);
    }

    @Override
    public InputStream getInputStream() throws IOException {
        final URLConnection con = this.url.openConnection();
        con.setUseCaches(false);
        try {
            return con.getInputStream();
        } catch (final IOException ex) {
            // Close the HTTP connection (if applicable).
            if (con instanceof HttpURLConnection) {
                ((HttpURLConnection) con).disconnect();
            }
            throw ex;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public String getUrl() {
        return url.toString();
    }
}

interface Resource {
    InputStream getInputStream() throws IOException;

    String getUrl();
}


// Multi thread approach.... just the idea... it won't compile
interface AsyncResource extends Resource {
    Future<Data> getData();       
}

// On Photo
public Photo(final AsyncResource resource) {
    this.resource = resource;
}

public Bitmap getBitmap() {
    final Future<Data> data = resource.getData();
     // call data.get(), Hopefully won't block
    // transform is to Bitmap
    // cache the result
    return bitmap;
}

class AsyncResourceProvider {
  final ExecutorService threadExecutor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);

  AsyncResource schedule(String path) {
    // submit the taks and return the future
  }

}
// Create a Dog and a Photo
AsyncResource resource = asyncResourceProvider.schedule(path);
Dog d = new Doc("black", new Photo(resource));
share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks for your detailed response, that makes a lot of sense. Just one concern, the download code in UrlResource.getInputStream() is going to block code execution so if the web server takes too long to respond then the user will be left hanging until an exception is thrown. Is your recommended approach suited to a multi threaded application? Or would it be better to have a single Downloader class which handles all the connection opening, data transfer and cleanup? Perhaps I'm missing the point, apologies if this is the case. – donturner Nov 29 '11 at 18:22
1  
Yes, it will block. I just copied the code from Spring source to give you a general idea. But, if you need an async download, you can extend the Resource interface and return a Java Future or something like that. You can have an executor in the UrlResource class. Or externalize this to an "AsyncResourceProvider". But, the general concepts are the same, you have "Resources". – Alejandro Diaz Nov 29 '11 at 18:49
    
Something is bugging me about this approach and it's taken me till now to figure out what it is. The download is still initiated inside a method within Dog, ie when Dog.getPhoto() is called. Is this really right for Dog to kick off its own download? – donturner Nov 29 '11 at 20:29
1  
No. When you call Dog.getPhoto() you get a Photo. Then when you call photo.getBitmap() the download is initiated. Then, the question is it's Photo a good place to initiate the download? For me the answer is: depends. Notice that the current download logic take place in the Resource implementation. Then, Photo does not care about from where the photo came from(please take a look to the Spring model to understand a little more). You can have multiple Resource implementation (again see Spring model) If you need a lazy process, then it's ok to trigger the download at the time you ask for the Photo – Alejandro Diaz Nov 30 '11 at 19:40
1  
I edited the example to provide an idea of how the multithread version should looks like. I don't think the "DownloadUtil" is a good approach... unless you have a small app. DownloadUtil suggest a class with static methods. Static stuff are not object oriented. Imagine if you want to cache the images on disk. With the Resource approach you can easily add behavior by extending the class or provide a custom implementation. – Alejandro Diaz Nov 30 '11 at 19:46

Downloading a file is a cross-cutting concern that isn't specifically related to a Dog. Because of that, I would recommend having a DownloadUtil (or something like that) that exists outside of Dog in which you implement the download.

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I agree that maybe dog isn't the best place for it. Maybe if you have other downloadable objects or plan to, you could do...

  public interface Downloadable { public String getUrl(); }

  public class Dog implements Downloadable...

  public class Downloader { public Bitmap download(Downloadable obj); }
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I see two options:

a) if the hierarchy allows for it, create an abstract super class with the functionality. It is easy, but very rigid.

b) A more flexible approach would be delegating this in a Downloader interface. Every object will be feed (setDownloader(Downloader downloader)) externally. Maybe allow a default HttpDownloader that is automatically created within the object. More flexible and eases testing, but some more work.

In the end, you should evaluate your problem and decide if the extra work is worth the risk of needing the feature in the future.

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Create another class Downloader that takes, in its constructor, an interface Animal. Then it will work with cats too ...

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Have Dog.download(). But let Dog.download() in-turn call a fileDownloader.download() as Chris points out.

I'm not sure if you could call this as a design pattern but this practice is called delegation


Update

And do not pass Dog object to fileDownloader.download() but only the URL it should be concerned with. A fileDownloader shouldn't need to change for any reason other than a download logic change. See also Single Responsibility principle

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