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I'm working on a wiki project. MVC3 + EF4 Code First.

All classes from my model inherit from a main "EditBase" class. This assures that they all have ID, Username and CreatedDate. It also helps me create a generic Repository for basic CRUDs.

I wish to define a new entity called AbuseReport to handle flagging of incorrect/innacurate content:

public class AbuseReport : EditBase
{
    public DateTime DateReported { get; set; }
    public string EntityType { get; set; }
    public int EntityId { get; set; }
    public int ReportTypeId { get; set; }
    public ReportType ReportType 
    {
        get { return (ReportType) this.ReportTypeId; }
        set { this.ReportTypeId = (int) value; }
    }
    public string Description { get; set; }
}

What would be the easiest way to retrieve an entity stored on the database starting from the information on a AbuseReport object? I can't use foreign keys because the report can refer to any entity on the project.

I would need to call something like this:

Type modelType;
entityDictionary.TryGetValue(entityName, out modelType);
var rep = new Repository<modelType>();
share|improve this question
    
your question isn't really clear. Are you just asking how to create a EF generic repository for based on T? If so, it has been asked/answered a number of times. –  RPM1984 Dec 6 '11 at 23:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

I would store all the model types in the same repository. The repository key will have to contain the type of the model as well as its ID. I use the local class RepositoryKey for this purpouse:

public class EditBase
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Username { get; set; }
    public DateTime CreatedDate { get; set; }
}

public class Repository
{
    private Dictionary<RepositoryKey, EditBase> _store = new Dictionary<RepositoryKey, EditBase>();

    public void Add(EditBase model)
    {
        _store.Add(new RepositoryKey(model), model);
    }

    public void Remove(EditBase model)
    {
        _store.Remove(new RepositoryKey(model));
    }

    public void Remove<T>(int id)
        where T : EditBase
    {
        _store.Remove(new RepositoryKey(typeof(T), id));
    }

    public bool TryGet<T>(int id, out T value)
        where T : EditBase
    {
        EditBase editBase;
        if (!_store.TryGetValue(new RepositoryKey(typeof(T), id), out editBase)) {
            value = null;
            return false;
        }
        value = (T)editBase;
        return true;
    }

    private class RepositoryKey : IEquatable<RepositoryKey>
    {
        private Type _modelType;
        private int _id;

        public RepositoryKey(EditBase model)
        {
            _modelType = model.GetType();
            _id = model.ID;
        }

        public RepositoryKey(Type modelType, int id)
        {
            _modelType = modelType;
            _id = id;
        }

        #region IEquatable<IdentityKey> Members

        public bool Equals(RepositoryKey other)
        {
            if (_modelType != other._modelType) {
                return false;
            }
            return _id == other._id;
        }

        #endregion

        public override int GetHashCode()
        {
            return _modelType.GetHashCode() ^ _id.GetHashCode();
        }
    }
}
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I'm gonna try this approach tomorrow morning and let you know. Thanks –  amhed Dec 8 '11 at 2:39
    
Thank you very much for the bounty! Note: I added a where T : EditBase in the Remove<T> method. This is technically not necessary, however more logical. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Dec 8 '11 at 19:48

i'm not completely sure i understand what you are after, but i believe the question is how to take an open generic type and make it a closed generic type.

if that's the case, try this reflection magic:

var repository = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(Repository<>).MakeGenericType(modelType));

or if you are using a container or something along those lines, resolve the resulting closed generic type from the MakeGenericType call from the container rather than using Activator.CreateInstance. either way, you should wind up with an instance of what you want.

is that along the lines of what you are looking for?

EDIT: in response to the question from Olivier Jacot-Descombes, here are some thoughts and code:

ideally, i'd use some of the built in capabilities of your ioc container of choice or something like this reflection code to register the open generic type with the container or some select closed types (capabilities of containers vary). then when using the generic type as a dependency, you can do so with knowledge of the type you intend to use as the generic parameter and resolve a known type from the container (in most cases you probably know exactly what type you are looking for when you actually use it). if that's not an option because of not using a container or having limited container capabilities, and the situation is a little different and you are asking for a generic type parameter you know at compile time, you could have a method something like this:

Repository<T> GetRepository<T>()
{
   return Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(Repository<T>));
}

if it truly is a situation like the question where that is not known, it's a tough question. one thought that comes to mind is to have a nongeneric Repository class (or whatever your type is that fits this pattern) and make the one with the generic type subclass the nongeneric (but it won't work if the methods depend on the generic type, which they probably do) and cast the result to the base, nongeneric type. probably very few situations where that would actually work.

another answer might be to make the class nongeneric and instead just have generic parameters for the methods. this is something i have done with my repositories and i think it's a better way to do it anyway and simplifies dependencies with just having one repository type instead of as many repository types as you have persistent classes.

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I read about this approach after reading on a couple of blogs and other SO questions, but would always get an error trying to instance Repository<> –  amhed Dec 5 '11 at 1:28
    
what error do you get? –  Dave Rael Dec 5 '11 at 3:32
    
This works, however repository will always be of object type, since it is resolved at compile time and all the compiler knows is, that CreateInstance has a return type of object. And also how do you want to programm against repository, if its exact type is not known at design-time and compile-time? –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Dec 6 '11 at 20:12
    
@OlivierJacot-Descombes - edited to try to address your difficult question. let me know if it comes close. –  Dave Rael Dec 6 '11 at 22:00
    
You are right, but in that case you could just create the repository with: var rep = new Repository<MyType>(). The question was, how to create it from an instance of System.Type in a truly dynamic way. You can create it in a fully dynamic way, but you can hardly consume it in a fully dynamic way. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Dec 6 '11 at 22:34

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