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I believe I need to use seed with time if I want to achieve randomeness. I wrote this code below, but in main, when I looped, it return random number, but happens 5th time. How can I achieve the 5 different value if myrand() is executed?

Thank you..

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int myrand() {
        int ue_imsi;
        int seed = time(NULL);
        srand(seed);
        ue_imsi = rand();

return ue_imsi;

}

int main()
{
        int value = 0;
        int i=0;
        for (i=0; i< 5; i++)
        {
        value =myrand();
        printf("value is %d\n", value);
        }
}
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5  
Seed once in your life, not all the time. –  Kerrek SB Nov 29 '11 at 16:43
    
You're initializing the random number generator with the same number over and over again (as long as time(NULL) returns the same value). Don't do that if you want the numbers to look like random. Also remember to #include <time.h> for time() prototype. –  pmg Nov 29 '11 at 16:45
1  
possible duplicate of Always repeated numbers given by rand(). Please use the search facilities of SO before asking a question. –  Jens Gustedt Nov 29 '11 at 19:53
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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Seeding the generator should be done once(for each sequence of random numbers you want to generate of course!):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
        int seed = time(NULL);
        srand(seed);
        int value = 0;
        int i=0;
        for (i=0; i< 5; i++)
        {
        value =rand();
        printf("value is %d\n", value);
        }
}
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If you want to reseed (for extra randomness) every time you call random(), here's one way you could do that:

srandom( time(0)+clock()+random() );
  • time() updates once per second, but will be different every time you run your program
  • clock() updates much more frequently, but starts at 0 every time you run your program
  • random() makes sure that you (usually) don't reseed with the same value twice in a row if your loop is faster than the granularity of clock()

Of course you could do more if you really, really, want randomness -- but this is a start.

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Try this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>
int main(void) {
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        printf("%ld\n", (long)time(NULL));
    }
}

My "guess" is that 10 equal values will be printed :)

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The point of seed() is to start the sequence of random numbers with a known value,
you will then always get the same sequence of numbers given the same seed.

This is why you have seed(), it both allows you to generate the same sequence for testing, or given a random seed (typically the time) you get a different sequence each time

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Move the srand() call into main(), before the loop.

In other words, call srand() once and then call rand() repeatedly, without any further calls to srand():

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    int value = 0;
    int i = 0;
    srand(time(NULL));
    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        value = rand();
        printf("value is %d\n", value);
    }
}
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errr. yeah it works. but why? –  xambo Nov 29 '11 at 16:45
2  
@xambo: When you call time() several times in quick succession, it is likely to return the same value, since the clock hasn't ticked. When you call srand() with the same seed, the following call to rand() will return the same value. As I said, don't try to reinitialize the generator every time you need a random value. –  NPE Nov 29 '11 at 16:47
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