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I've searched for a solution, but have not yet found one that works...

I'm trying to update multiple values in a column based on distinct values in another column. For example:

If status = F05 then statusID = 987
If status = F12 then statusID = 12957

I've tried this with no success:

UPDATE myTable
SET statusID = CASE status
   WHEN 'F05' THEN 987
   WHEN 'F12' THEN 12957
END

There are thousands that need updating so, of course, I'd like to run this in a single update query.

What am I missing? What am I doing wrong?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
Your UPDATE query looks fine. Describe "I've tried this with no success". What happened? –  Adrian Carneiro Nov 29 '11 at 16:51
1  
CASE can only be used in VBA, not in an MS Access Query. –  Tim Lentine Nov 29 '11 at 17:11

1 Answer 1

In access you can use the SWITCH function. The CASE statement doesn't work.

UPDATE myTable
SET statusID = 
SWITCH 
   ( [status] = 'F05', 987,
     [status] = 'F12', 12957)  

However if you have too many items you might want to create a Mapping table who's data looks like

OldStatus | NewStatus
---------------------
F05       | 987
F12       | 12957

And then perform the following

UPDATE 
       myTable  
       INNER JOIN Mapping ON myTable.Status  = Mapping.OldStatus
 SET 
        myTable.Status = Mapping.NewStatus;
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant! Thank you! –  kern mann Nov 29 '11 at 17:28
    
This is working very well. I've exported the table, used Excel to concatenate the fields in the format of the code, and brought it back in as my update query. What an enormous time saver! Thank you for this gift! ~kern –  kern mann Nov 29 '11 at 19:00
    
Oh no... :) SWITCH worked great for my first set, however it gives an "expression too complex" error if I use more than 15 items... How can I perform this en masse? –  kern mann Nov 29 '11 at 19:26
    
@kern mann Yuck well you can try a mapping table approach. See updated answer –  Conrad Frix Nov 29 '11 at 19:46

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