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I want to translate some Java code into C++. One of the Java classes extends the Thread class and contains the following method:

 public static synchronized String createUniqueID() {
    //some code here
}

How can I synchronize (in the Java sense of the word) class methods in C++ using Boost? I have read about using boost::mutex for synchronizing access to shared data, but I am not sure how to apply this to C++ class methods.

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Do you know what synchronized does? You just need to emulate the same thing with boost::mutex. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 29 '11 at 17:09
    
I know about boost::mutex and i have used it for shared data. However, i dont know how can we use it for methods? can you help by providing an example code? –  sufyan siddique Nov 29 '11 at 17:11
    
Depending on the specifics, you might even be able to get away with some atomics. –  Kerrek SB Nov 29 '11 at 17:16
    
Lock at this: stackoverflow.com/questions/578904/… –  ante Nov 29 '11 at 17:17
    
synchronized for protecting shared data as well. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 29 '11 at 17:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The following is equivalent to a Java synchronized method in C++. In fact, it is exactly equivalent, with the obvious exceptions that it is written in a different language and a different threading library.

class Thing {
  public:
    static std::string createUniqueId () {
        boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> synchronized(mutex_);
        // ... generate a unique id here.
    }

  protected:
    static boost::mutex mutex_;
};

Note that the mutex is protected, not private, allowing you to use the same mutex (as you should) in subclasses.

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Notice that the given method is static. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 29 '11 at 17:20
    
Totally. Thanks for the catch. –  Andres Jaan Tack Nov 29 '11 at 17:23
    
thanks a lot for you help –  sufyan siddique Nov 29 '11 at 17:35

actually i do not understand what you said that "but I am not sure how to apply this to C++ class methods"

boost::mutex

you want to use, you must declare that. is not take effect now you must use

`boost::mutex::scoped_lock `

to effect it it can unlock automaticlly

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thanks for your help –  sufyan siddique Nov 29 '11 at 17:36

Use a static (i.e. class) mutex.

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thanks for your help –  sufyan siddique Nov 29 '11 at 17:35

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