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I need to define a get method in two different ways. One for simple types T. And once for std::vector.

template<typename T>
const T& Parameters::get(const std::string& key)
{
    Map::iterator i = params_.find(key);
    ...
    return boost::lexical_cast<T>(boost::get<std::string>(i->second));
    ...
}

How can I specialize this method for std::vector. As there the code should look something like this:

template<typename T>
const T& Parameters::get(const std::string& key)
{
    Map::iterator i = params_.find(key);
    std::vector<std::string> temp = boost::get<std::vector<std::string> >(i->second)
    std::vector<T> ret(temp.size());
    for(int i=0; i<temp.size(); i++){
         ret[i]=boost::lexical_cast<T>(temp[i]);
    }
    return ret;    
}

But I do not know how to specialize the function for this. Thanks a lot.

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possible duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/1318458/… –  bbtrb Nov 29 '11 at 17:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Don't specialize function template.

Instead, use overload.

Write a function template get_impl to handle the general case, and overload (not specialize) this to handle the specific case, then call get_impl from get as:

template<typename T>
const T& Parameters::get(const std::string& key)
{
     //read the explanation at the bottom for the second argument!
     return get_impl(key, static_cast<T*>(0) );
}

And here goes the actual implementations.

//general case
template<typename T>
const T& Parameters::get_impl(const std::string& key, T*)
{
    Map::iterator i = params_.find(key);
    return boost::lexical_cast<T>(boost::get<std::string>(i->second));
}

//this is overload - not specialization
template<typename T>
const std::vector<T>& Parameters::get_impl(const std::string& key, std::vector<T> *)
{
      //vector specific code
}

The static_cast<T*>(0) in get is just a tricky way to disambiguate the call. The type of static_cast<T*>(0) is T*, and passing it as second argument to get_impl will help compiler to choose the correct version of get_impl. If T is not std::vector, the first version will be chosen, otherwise the second version will be chosen.

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1  
Thanks a lot, that was exactly what I was looking for. –  tune2fs Nov 29 '11 at 19:20
1  
+1, I didn't think of the cast... –  Nim Nov 30 '11 at 8:39
    
static_cast<T*>(nullptr) –  Janek Olszak Aug 19 at 8:07

Erm. call it something else? e.g.

template<typename T>
const T& Parameters::getVector(const std::string& key)
{
  Map::iterator i = params_.find(key);
  std::vector<std::string> temp = boost::get<std::vector<std::string> >(i->second)
  // T is already a vector
  T ret; ret.reserve(temp.size());
  for(int i=0; i<temp.size(); i++){
     ret.push_back(boost::lexical_cast<typename T::value_type>(temp[i]));
  }
  return ret;  
}

You'll have to call this as:

foo.getVector<std::vector<int> > ("some_key");

Nothing in your question precludes this.

Now, if you really do need to use get(), then you have to rely on partially specializing a structure, as function partial specialization is not supported by the language.

This is a lot more complicated, for example:

template <typename T>
struct getter
{
  const T& operator()(std::string const& key)
  {
    // default operations
  }
};

// Should double check this syntax 
template <typename T>
struct getter<std::vector<T, std::allocator<T> > >
{
  typedef std::vector<T, std::allocator<T> > VecT;
  const VecT& operator()(std::string const& key)
  {
    // operations for vector
  }
};

Then in you method becomes:

template<typename T>
const T& Parameters::get(const std::string& key)
{
  return getter<T>()(key); // pass the structures getter needs?
}
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Do you have to call it in another name? Wouldn't overloading just do the trick? –  the_drow Nov 29 '11 at 17:34
    
@the_drow You cannot overload based on return type. –  Christian Rau Nov 29 '11 at 18:01
    
@ChristianRau: Sure you can with some template magic. template<typename T> T ft(); template<> int ft<int>() { return 1; } template<> float ft<float>() { return 0; } struct f { template<typename T> operator T() { return ft<T>(); } }; int main() { int il = f(); float fl = f(); cout << il, fl; } litb wrote this btw. –  the_drow Nov 30 '11 at 0:06
    
@Nim: Instead of making getter a class template, you could make operator() a function template and instead of defining one operator(), define two operator(), one for each case (general as well as specific). That way you would not need to specialize getter. There is also one plus point (syntactically): you could call this as : getter()(key) instead of getter<T>()(key). –  Nawaz Nov 30 '11 at 8:46
    
.... But either way, it has a drawback : getter cannot access members of Parameters class. So I think, it is better to make the actual implementations member of the class (like I've done), rather than defining new struct. –  Nawaz Nov 30 '11 at 8:52

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