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I have a method which as an argument has an iterator to the collection. Inside the method I want to copy the collection the iterator is "pointing to". However only the last collection entry is present in the collection copy, it is present N times, where N is the size of the original collection.

public void someMethod(Iterator<Node> values) {
  Vector<Node> centralNodeNeighbourhood = new Vector<Node>();
  while (values.hasNext()) {
    Node tmp = values.next();
    centralNodeNeighbourhood.add(tmp);
  }
  ...
  //store the centralNodeNeighbourhood on disk
}

Exemplar "original collection":

1
2
3

Exemplar "centralNodeNeighbourhood collection":

3
3
3

Can someone point me to my mistake? I can not change the method args, I only get the Iterator to the collection, can't do anything about it.

UPDATE (Answer to some questions)

while (values.hasNext()) {
            Node tmp = values.next();
            System.out.print("Adding = "+tmp.toString());
            centralNodeNeighbourhood.add(tmp);
        }

Prints proper original collection elements. I don't know what type is the original collection, but the Iterator is from std java. The method is the

public class GatherNodeNeighboursInfoReducer extends MapReduceBase
        implements Reducer<IntWritable, Node, NullWritable, NodeNeighbourhood>{
    public void reduce(IntWritable key, Iterator<Node> values,
                   OutputCollector<NullWritable, NodeNeighbourhood> output, Reporter reporter) throws IOException {...}
}

method from OLD Hadoop api (Hadoop version 0.20.203.0)

SOLVED I made a copy of tmp object at each iteration, and I add this copy to the centralNodeNeighbourhood collection. This solved my problem. Thx for all your (fast) help.

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If you dump tmp in this loop does it show what you expect? –  Dave Newton Nov 29 '11 at 18:07
1  
How a given iterator operates is implementation-specific to the class which provides it; Therefore, The class which is providing you the iterator may well have a bug in their design. Is this collection that you give to it part of the standard java library, or is it user-made? –  djhaskin987 Nov 29 '11 at 18:08
    
Test if you get the same instance with the == operator. Tell us the result of the test. –  Puce Nov 29 '11 at 18:22
    
@Puce Yes I get true from "==" operator for every tmp instance compared with centralNodeNeighbourhood.get(0), but the data inside the tmp object is different, each iteration. –  alien01 Nov 29 '11 at 18:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Its appears that the Iterator is returning the same Node object each time. If so, you need to take a copy of the Node before adding it to the collection. (Otherwise you will be adding the same object each time and it will have the last values it was set to)

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2  
Huh? I don't really understand what you are suggesting as fix, but if the Iterator is broken, you are screwed, aren't you? –  erickson Nov 29 '11 at 18:06
2  
Some Iterators return the same object each time. i.e. every time you call values.next() you are actually getting the same object (set to different values) There are generally considered confusion but legal. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 29 '11 at 18:09
    
Here is an example of a collection whose entrySet() iterator return the same object in Next() each time. tech.puredanger.com/2009/06/11/collections-puzzler –  Peter Lawrey Nov 29 '11 at 18:11
1  
@PeterLawrey Fortunately, I think the JDK collections that did that have been fixed in JDK7. –  ColinD Nov 29 '11 at 18:46
    
What happens if you print out System.identityHashCode(tmp); for each iteration? Is it the same value each time? Just making sure you get different values for each object, for the sake of verifying Peter's claim. –  black panda Nov 29 '11 at 18:47

Hadoop's reduce method specifies that it reuses the value objects in its iterator. That's a terrible thing to do, but that's what it does.

The framework will reuse the key and value objects that are passed into the reduce, therefore the application should clone the objects they want to keep a copy of. In many cases, all values are combined into zero or one value.

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