Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am having a particularly annoying problem. In certain situations, calls to glColor appear to be ignored, resulting in objects being displayed with the incorrect color.

A Qt project which shows this problem can be found here.

When you run the program, all you see on the screen is two box-like objects, viewed from an angle. The object on the left is rendered by calling glCallList(boxModel1); and the object on the right is rendered by calling glCallList(boxModel2);. The two display lists are created by obviously-titled methods.

For both boxModel1 and boxModel2, I use a single display list called squareModel to render the sides of the boxes. I do this because while the square model in this case is trivial, the squareModel in my actual program is much more complex, with altered normals and etc.

The problem has something to do with the createManyRectangles method. When it is called with a small enough number (2715 for me), the colors appear normally: a blue box and a red box. When the number is high (2716 for me), the colors are ignored, and both boxes are rendered white.

Can anyone shed some light on what is happening here?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
+50

Try to run your program with glIntercept. This allows you to record every OpenGL call made. Compare the output you get between the 2715 and 2716 number of rectangles. If there are any differences, it should lead you in the right direction.

edit

Since your actual OpenGL calls seem ok, it could be a driver problem as you mentioned. You could try different environments (video card, pc, etc) since as totem pointed out, he didn't experience your problem. Perhaps you could give some info on your environment?

Try rendering your rectangles without display lists to see if that helps. Where you would use glCallList, redo the sequence of OpenGL calls instead. If that solves the problem, you will know there is a problem with the display lists management in your app or in the driver.

Also, in case display lists turn out to be the problem, do you really need to use display lists? They have been less and less used for a while now in favor of VBOs. Perhaps you can "solve" your display list problem with that.

share|improve this answer
    
I ran it. Here's the output for 2715: link. Here's the output for 2716: link. note that I cut out most of the "many rectangles" calls to save space, but i only cut out parts that were identical. The only differences are memory addresses when setting up the context, memory addresses when swapping buffers, and the addition of one glColor and four glVertex calls. In other words, there are no differences that one wouldn't expect to be there. How do I interpret this? A driver bug? –  Elliott Dec 4 '11 at 19:43
    
I had a look at your output and unfortunately you're right... I can't see anything wrong with the sequence of OpenGL calls. –  bernie Dec 4 '11 at 21:27
    
have a look at my edit –  bernie Dec 5 '11 at 3:05
    
As a temporary compromise, I was able to fix the problem by removing the square display list. Instead, it's just a method that creates a square, and the method gets called in places where the display list would have been called. In the long run I'll definitely look at vbos. thanks for your help with the glintercept program, that narrowed down the possible causes pretty quickly. –  Elliott Dec 5 '11 at 18:43

All rendering is done via display lists, but the problem occurs both when I specify the color in the display list and when I specify the color right before I call the display list.

Display lists are not self-contained. They do not restore OpenGL state after they have changed it. If a DL changes OpenGL state, then that will be OpenGL's state after the DL has executed.

You simply haven't posted enough code to definitively say anything; this is just the most likely explanation. Until you can post a reproducible case, there's no real way to help.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see how this helps. There's never a time when I don't explicitly specify the color I want for each primitive, either in a display list or right before it. My problem is that I make a call to glColor, and in the very next line of code, OpenGL's color has not changed. –  Elliott Nov 29 '11 at 19:00
1  
@Elliott: You didn't post any code that would reproduce the problem. So all I have to go on is what you say. The most likely explanation, outside of a driver bug, is that your display list changed the state before you read it back with glGetFloatv. Are you checking for OpenGL errors? –  Nicol Bolas Nov 29 '11 at 19:04
    
I updated my drivers and it still happens. There are no OpenGL errors. As for the display list changing the color, the getFloatv call is on the line immediately following the glColor4f call, so nothing could be changing it. I realize that it's really really hard to just pull a fix up without seeing the code. I'm working on a reproducible version, but it's a pretty big program. –  Elliott Nov 30 '11 at 2:44
    
I added a reproducible project. Hopefully that should help. –  Elliott Dec 1 '11 at 21:13
    
Downloaded and compiled given project. makeManyRectangles(100000) ; does not produce bugged display... –  azf Dec 2 '11 at 20:24

I had a similar problem where I plotted a lot of points with different colors and afterwards a blue wireframe cube. (I used GLUT for my project.)

Initially my code looked like this:

glBegin(GL_POINTS);

    for(int i=0;i<N;i++)
     {
      glColor3f(R[i],G[i],B[i]);
      glVertex3f(X[i],Y[i],Z[i]);
     }

glEnd();
glColor3f(0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f);
glutWireCube(2.0f);

However, this resulted in a flickering cube that continously changed it color from frame to frame to some unpredictable colors as if the last glColor3f is just ignored.

Solution: I put the glColor3f for the cube before the glEnd().

glBegin(GL_POINTS);

    for(int i=0;i<N;i++)
     {
      glColor3f(R[i],G[i],B[i]);
      glVertex3f(X[i],Y[i],Z[i]);
     }

glColor3f(0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f);    // <= Changed only the position of this line
glEnd();
glutWireCube(2.0f);

I don't know WHY, but this solved my problem. Now I get a blue wireframe cube and the glColor3f is no longer ignored...

cheers,

David

share|improve this answer
1  
It seems like this kind of stuff is to be expected. After this, I did a lot of research, and it turns out that the entire fixed-function pipeline (ie calling glBegin, glVertex, etc) is deprecated, and most graphics cards don't even support it in hardware anymore, and the software implementations probably have a lot lower priority in terms of development time. –  Elliott Aug 19 '12 at 4:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.