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In my code there are three concurrent routines. I try to give a brief overview of my code,

Routine 1 {
do something

*Send int to Routine 2
Send int to Routine 3
Print Something
Print Something*

do something
}

Routine 2 {
do something

*Send int to Routine 1
Send int to Routine 3
Print Something
Print Something*

do something
}

Routine 3 {
do something

*Send int to Routine 1
Send int to Routine 2
Print Something
Print Something*

do something
}

main {
routine1
routine2
routine3
}

I want that, while codes between two do something (codes between two star marks) is executing, flow of control must not go to other go routines. For example, when routine1 is executing the events between two stars (sending and printing events), routine 2 and 3 must be blocked (means flow of execution does not pass to routine 2 or 3 from routine 1).After completing last print event, flow of execution may pass to routine 2 or 3.Can anybody help me by specifying, how can I achieve this ? Is it possible to implement above specification by WaitGroup ? Can anybody show me by giving a simple example how to implement above specified example by using WaitGroup. Thanks.

NB: I give two sending and two printing options, in fact there is lots of sending and printing.

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I have asked this question in the previous time. However, as there I make some mistakes, I am asking it another time. I modify my previous question also like it. –  Arpssss Nov 29 '11 at 18:45
    
Please provide a clear scenario and even your own implementation of this (even if it's not working). What "send" command here means? If it's calling a function the above code is an infinite loop. –  Mostafa Nov 30 '11 at 0:05
1  
Here send means, sending an integer. My code can be found in play.golang.org/p/wYFViAQbN2. In that code I want, while line 27 to 35 of routine 1 (you can say critical section of routine 1) is executing, other routines must stop their execution. –  Arpssss Nov 30 '11 at 0:13
1  
Thanks for the helpful update. You can't stop other goroutines, but can block execution of specific parts of different goroutines to avoid simultaneous execution using mutex or blocking channels. In this case, I can help you in waiting at line 27 until other goroutines finish and wait at the beginning of other goroutines until line 35. If that's what you want I can explain it with code. –  Mostafa Nov 30 '11 at 0:25
    
I want, for example in the case above, when routine1 is executing the sending and printing event, the routine 2 and 3 is blocked (means flow of execution does not pass to routine 2 or 3). After completing last print event, flow of execution may pass to routine 2 or 3. –  Arpssss Nov 30 '11 at 0:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I have gotten it correctly, what you want is to prevent simultaneous execution of some part of each function and other functions. The following code does this: fmt.Println lines won't happen as other routines are running. Here's what happens: when execution gets to the print section, it waits until other routines end, if they are running, and while this print line is executing other routines don't start and wait. I hope that is what you are looking for. Correct me if I'm wrong about this.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "rand"
    "sync"
)

var (
    mutex1, mutex2, mutex3 sync.Mutex
    wg sync.WaitGroup
)

func Routine1() {
    mutex1.Lock()
    // do something
    for i := 0; i < 200; i++ {
        mutex2.Lock()
        mutex3.Lock()
        fmt.Println("value of z")
        mutex2.Unlock()
        mutex3.Unlock()
    }
    // do something
    mutex1.Unlock()
    wg.Done()
}

func Routine2() {
    mutex2.Lock()
    // do something
    for i := 0; i < 200; i++ {
        mutex1.Lock()
        mutex3.Lock()
        fmt.Println("value of z")
        mutex1.Unlock()
        mutex3.Unlock()
    }
    // do something
    mutex2.Unlock()
    wg.Done()
}

func Routine3() {
    mutex3.Lock()
    // do something
    for i := 0; i < 200; i++ {
        mutex1.Lock()
        mutex2.Lock()
        fmt.Println("value of z")
        mutex1.Unlock()
        mutex2.Unlock()
    }
    // do something
    mutex3.Unlock()
    wg.Done()
}

func main() {
    wg.Add(3)
    go Routine1()
    go Routine2()
    Routine3()
    wg.Wait()
}

UPDATE: Let me explain these three mutex here: a mutex is, as documentation says: "a mutual exclusion lock." That means when you call Lock on a mutex your code just waits there if somebody else have locked the same mutex. Right after you call Unlock that blocked code will be resumed.

Here I put each function in its own mutex by locking a mutex at the beginning of the function and unlocking it the end. By this simple mechanism you can avoid running any part of code you want at the same time as those functions. For instance, everywhere you want to have a code that should not be running when Routine1 is running, simply lock mutex1 at the beginning of that code and unlock at at the end. That is what I did in appropriate lines in Routine2 and Routine3. Hope that clarifies things.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot Mostafa. Here,suppose in routine 1, if I add some more print events between mutex3.Lock() mutex2.Unlock(), until those events will not execute, routine 2 & 3 can't be able to execute any event. Correct ? –  Arpssss Nov 30 '11 at 1:00
    
Yes, you're right. Let me update my answer with a clear explanation what these three mutex do here. –  Mostafa Nov 30 '11 at 1:05
    
Sorry Mostafa I share your code play.golang.org/p/VsQ_09FGVQ. However, it is only executing routine 3 not statements of routine 2 or 1. Can you kindly help me to get the error ? –  Arpssss Nov 30 '11 at 1:17
    
I was focused on making mutexes work, and had forgotten about adding WaitGroup for the goroutines. This updated version works fine. Please also notice that in main I don't run Routine3 as a goroutine just because in your main example it wasn't like that. You can simply run that as a goroutine too, and everything will work fine still. –  Mostafa Nov 30 '11 at 1:27
1  
@peterSO a slice of mutexes? –  Mostafa Nov 30 '11 at 1:31

You could use sync.Mutex. For example everything between "im.Lock()" and "im.Unlock()" will exclude the other goroutine.

package main

import (
"fmt"
"sync"
)

func f1(wg *sync.WaitGroup, im *sync.Mutex, i *int) {
  for {
    im.Lock()
    (*i)++
    fmt.Printf("Go1: %d\n", *i)
    done := *i >= 10
    im.Unlock()
    if done {
      break
    }
  }
  wg.Done()
}

func f2(wg *sync.WaitGroup, im *sync.Mutex, i *int) {
  for {
    im.Lock()
    (*i)++
    fmt.Printf("Go2: %d\n", *i)
    done := *i >= 10
    im.Unlock()
    if done {
      break
    }
  }
  wg.Done()
}

func main() {
    var wg sync.WaitGroup

    var im sync.Mutex
    var i int

    wg.Add(2)
    go f1(&wg, &im, &i)
    go f2(&wg, &im, &i)
    wg.Wait()   

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot laslowh. However, can it be possible to implement it for the case stated by me. Because, it looks after first routine completes second routine starts (sorry, may be I am wrong as I am quite new in Go). Can you kindly illustrate this for my example ? –  Arpssss Nov 29 '11 at 21:21
1  
Well, the short story is that you have no knowledge of when the goroutines execute, however it is not the case that the above code would wait for the first one to finish before starting the second. The only thing that a Mutex can do is make sure that they do not execute "critical sections" simultaneously. A critical section is anything between a Lock and an Unlock call. –  laslowh Nov 29 '11 at 21:30
1  
Sorry for my mistake. Actually, what I am trying to say, in my example routine1,2 & 3 is defined not in the main function (I modify my example). Is it possible to implement Sync & Mutex for the case of my example. Can you kindly give simple example of how can I implement Sync & Mutex for the example case given by me (sorry I have very few idea about Go). Thanks. –  Arpssss Nov 29 '11 at 21:52
    
This code is like what I wanted to suggest to you. If your only problem with this is about implementing this out of main, that's easy: define wg and im (and even i in this example) as global variables; define these two closures as separate functions; and run them with go <funcname>. Does this help? –  Mostafa Nov 30 '11 at 0:09
    
Can you illustrate it by giving a simple example code or pseudo code ? –  Arpssss Nov 30 '11 at 0:22

Another way would be to have a control channel, with only one goroutine allowed to execute at any one time, with each routine sending back to the 'control lock' whenever they are done doing their atomic operation:

package main
import "fmt"
import "time"

func routine(id int, control chan struct{}){
    for {
        // Get the control
        <-control
        fmt.Printf("routine %d got control\n", id)
        fmt.Printf("A lot of things happen here...")
        time.Sleep(1)
        fmt.Printf("... but only in routine %d !\n", id)
        fmt.Printf("routine %d gives back control\n", id)
        // Sending back the control to whichever other routine catches it
        control<-struct{}{}
    }
}

func main() {
    // Control channel is blocking
    control := make(chan struct{})

    // Start all routines
    go routine(0, control)
    go routine(1, control)
    go routine(2, control)

    // Sending control to whichever catches it first
    control<-struct{}{}
    // Let routines play for some time...
    time.Sleep(10)
    // Getting control back and terminating
    <-control
    close(control)
    fmt.Println("Finished !")
}

This prints:

routine 0 got control
A lot of things happen here...... but only in routine 0 !
routine 0 gives back control
routine 1 got control
A lot of things happen here...... but only in routine 1 !
routine 1 gives back control
routine 2 got control
A lot of things happen here...... but only in routine 2 !
routine 2 gives back control
routine 0 got control
A lot of things happen here...... but only in routine 0 !
routine 0 gives back control
routine 1 got control
A lot of things happen here...... but only in routine 1 !
routine 1 gives back control
routine 2 got control
A lot of things happen here...... but only in routine 2 !
routine 2 gives back control
routine 0 got control
A lot of things happen here...... but only in routine 0 !
routine 0 gives back control
routine 1 got control
A lot of things happen here...... but only in routine 1 !
routine 1 gives back control
routine 2 got control
A lot of things happen here...... but only in routine 2 !
routine 2 gives back control
routine 0 got control
A lot of things happen here...... but only in routine 0 !
routine 0 gives back control
routine 1 got control
A lot of things happen here...... but only in routine 1 !
routine 1 gives back control
routine 2 got control
A lot of things happen here...... but only in routine 2 !
routine 2 gives back control
Finished !
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You are asking for a library function that explicitly stop other routines ? Make it clear that, it is not possible in Go and also for most other languages. And sync, mutex case is not possible for your case.

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