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I'm testing extensively with JUnit and sometimes - while debugging my code - I want (temporary) only run a single @Test of my @RunWith(Arquillian.class) test class. Currently I'm adding a @Ignore to all other tests and wondering if something like @IgnoreOther does exist.

Are there better solutions to ignore all other tests?

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This one speaks about runtime ignoring programmaticallyspeaking.blogspot.com/2008/10/… –  mprabhat Nov 29 '11 at 18:53
2  
Does your IDE not allow you to simply highlight the test you're interested in and only run that? –  Duncan Nov 29 '11 at 19:00
    
I don't know of an annotation like that, but I do the same thing quite a bit. Maybe a good idea for a feature request? –  Jakrabbit Nov 29 '11 at 19:01
    
@Duncan: I often execute Arquillian tests from the console. –  Thor Nov 30 '11 at 5:50
    
@Jakrabbit: The tracker for junit hosted in Sourceforge is only visible for group members. I'm not sure where to post such a feature request. –  Thor Nov 30 '11 at 5:51
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Looks like, a new feature in JUnit 4.7 will help. Here is a write up on that one. And, another one.

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Just my two cents. You can try to use Junit Rules as @srkavin suggested.

Here is an example.

package org.foo.bar;

import org.junit.rules.MethodRule;
import org.junit.runners.model.FrameworkMethod;
import org.junit.runners.model.Statement;

public class SingleTestRule implements MethodRule {
    private String applyMethod;
    public SingleTestRule(String applyMethod) {
        this.applyMethod = applyMethod;
    }
    @Override
    public Statement apply(final Statement statement, final FrameworkMethod method, final Object target) {
        return new Statement() {
            @Override
            public void evaluate() throws Throwable {
                if (applyMethod.equals(method.getName())) {
                    statement.evaluate();
                }
            }
        };
    }
}

package org.foo.bar;

import org.junit.Assert;
import org.junit.Rule;
import org.junit.Test;

public class IgnoreAllTest {

    @Rule
    public SingleTestRule test = new SingleTestRule("test1");

    @Test
    public void test1() throws Exception {
        System.out.println("test1");
    }

    @Test
    public void test2() throws Exception {
        Assert.fail("test2");
    }

    @Test
    public void test3() throws Exception {
        Assert.fail("test3");
    }

}
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1  
+1 Should be using TestRule with 4.9 and later versions though. –  Matthew Farwell Nov 29 '11 at 20:10
    
Agree. Too lazy to replace eclipse built-in 4.8 version. –  mijer Nov 29 '11 at 20:14
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The simplest way is to replace all @Test to //###$$$@Test. Then when your debugging is finished replace //###$$$@Test to @Test.

Moreover typically IDEs allow running one test only. For example in Eclipse you can do it from Outline view.

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The answer from srkavin (and mijer) is correct, but the provided code is deprecated from jnuit version 4.9. The interface and also the method signature have changed. I want to provide this for others interested in this issue.

public class IgnoreOtherRule implements TestRule
{
  private String applyMethod;

  public IgnoreOtherRule(String applyMethod){
    this.applyMethod = applyMethod;
  }

  @Override
  public Statement apply(final Statement statement, final Description description)
  {
    return new Statement()
    {
        @Override
        public void evaluate() throws Throwable {
            if (applyMethod.equals(description.getMethodName())) {
                statement.evaluate();
            }
        }
    };
  }
}
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