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In this javascript code f.init() control the entire flow of the program:

var f = function() {
    return {
        init: function(var1) {
            try {
                f.f1(1)
            } catch (e) {
                alert(e);
            }
            try {
                f.f2(1)
            } catch (e) {
                alert(e);
            }
            // ...
            // more try-catch blocks                
            // ...
        },
        f1: function() {
            throw Error('f1 called');
        },
        f2: function() {
            throw Error('f2 called');
        }
    };
}();

f.init();

How I could centralize all exceptions management in only one try-catch block? Something like this:

var f = function() {
    return {
        init: function(var1) {
            f.f1(1) // this cut the control flow if thrown some error
            f.f2(1) // so this is not called
        },
        f1: function() {
                throw Error('f1 called');
        },
        f2: function() {
                throw Error('f2 called');
        }
    };
}();

try {
    f.init();
} catch (e) {
    alert(e);
}

The previous code cut the flow after thrown some error.

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1  
you might want to re-examine your use of exceptions... They don't seem like they're signifying exceptional (unexpected) cases... –  jondavidjohn Nov 29 '11 at 18:53
1  
Are you saying you want it to do something whenever an exception occurs, but then continue through the rest of the code in the try? –  James Montagne Nov 29 '11 at 18:54
    
@james-montagne +1 I would run f.f2() even after f.f1() thrown some error. But as jondavidjohn +1 says I am not using the exceptions concept well. –  Igor Parra Nov 29 '11 at 19:07
    
I'm not fully sure that we've understood the question... –  Álvaro G. Vicario Nov 29 '11 at 19:16
    
@lvaro-g-vicario The idea is not use so many try-catch blocks. But now I understand that exceptions pass control to upper levels. So it is not well used if I want continue the flow in the same level. –  Igor Parra Nov 29 '11 at 19:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't. Once an error is thrown, the program flow breaks.

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Correct! Logging will not break the flow. In modern browsers you can even do stuff like console.error, console.warn, console.log –  Joe Nov 29 '11 at 19:04
    
+1 That is? just breaks? Pass the control to an upper level, right? So maybe in this case I should call some method to alert/log errors but not thrown exceptions. Correct? –  Igor Parra Nov 29 '11 at 19:08
    
You must be thinking about syntax errors. If you throw inside try{} program flow jumps to matching catch{}, doesn't it? –  Álvaro G. Vicario Nov 29 '11 at 19:13

You cannot . But there is a trick to handle multiple-catch :

try{

 try{
   firstTrial();
 }
 catch(e1){
   secondTrial();
 }

}catch(e2){
   thirdTrial();
}
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