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I have a list of say two values, I'm then supposed to multiply each value by an integer until both elements in become integers and append these new values to a new list. Say I have a list [0.5,1], what's supposed to happen is that I'm gonna multiply each by 2 and get 1 and 2 and append these to a new list [1,2]. For the code I've written, I get four values(!) in my new list when I'm just supposed to get two, where in the code lies the error?

    u=1
    newlist = [1, 0.5]
    alist = []
    while True:

        cont = True

        for value in newlist:

            w = value*u
            rounded = round(w)
            alist.append(rounded)



            if not (abs(rounded - w)<=0.1):
                cont = False
        if cont:
            break
        u+=1
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4 Answers 4

It looks like you should be clearing alist inside of the while loop, otherwise each run through the for loop will append len(newlist) items to alist without removing previous elements of alist.

u = 1 
newlist = [1, 0.5]
while True:
    alist = []
    cont = True
    for value in newlist:
        w = value*u
        rounded = round(w)
        alist.append(rounded)
        if not abs(rounded - w) <= 0.1:
            cont = False
    if cont:
        break
    u += 1

>>> alist
[2.0, 1.0]
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The reason why you're getting four values is because you're using the same list over the course of several loops, and you keep adding elements to that same list. Besides that, there are a couple of errors in your code, I think it's simpler if I show you a working version and you figure them out:

u = 1
newlist = [1, 0.5]
alist = []

while True:
    cont = True
    alist = []
    for value in newlist:
        w = value*u
        if int(w) != w:
            cont = False
            break
        alist.append(int(w))
    if cont:
        break
    u += 1
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Thanks everyone, 'tis like F.J. said, I simply put alist in the while-loop and it worked perfectly. It's amazing how much a difference such minute changes can do to your program. Thanks again, much appreciated! –  user1036197 Nov 29 '11 at 19:24

I'm kindof having trouble following your code, here, this is how you could do it:

vals = [1,0.5]
i=1

while 1:
        if (vals[0] * i) % 1.0 == 0:
                if (vals[1] * i) % 1.0 == 0:
                        print i
                        vals[0] = vals[0]*i
                        vals[1] = vals[1]*i
                        print vals
                        break
        i+=1
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Using functions can make things easier to understand. Here's one attempt.

def nearly_int(x):
    return abs(x - round(x)) < 0.1

def find_multiple(a, b):
    u = 1
    while not nearly_int(a * u) or not nearly_int(b * u):
        u += 1
    return [round(a * u), round(b * u)]

newlist = [1, 0.5]
alist = find_multiple(*newlist)
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