Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I don't understand why sometimes I need to use fflush() and sometimes not.

My program is segfaulting at the moment and I am debugging it with print statements. When a program segfaults, does stdout not flush its buffer automatically?

share|improve this question
1  
stdout is just a pointer, it doesn't "do" anything by itself. The real question would be, "doesn't the OS flush all open files?" –  Kerrek SB Nov 29 '11 at 19:10
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't understand why sometimes I need to use fflush() and sometimes not.

Sometimes the stdio buffers are flushed sometimes they aren't. For example simply including a "\n" in the printed stuff will typically flush it (because stdout is by default line-buffered when attached to a terminal).

When a program segfaults, does stdout not flush its buffer automatically ?

Stdio buffers are flushed by exit. When a signal (such as SIGSEGV) kills a process, exit is not called. Another way to exit a process without flushing the stdio buffers is to use the Unix-specific call _exit.

share|improve this answer
add comment

No, why should it. The program gets killed by the operating system. If a segfault occurs, the program is no longer in a meaningful state, so nothing can safely happen at that point other than immediate termination.

(And don't nobody try to register a signal handler for SIGSEGV.)

share|improve this answer
    
In some cases, registering a signal handler for SIGSEGV is valid - for instance if you're making a read-only mapping with mmap, you can catch and longjmp out of write attempts on it with a signal handler, and this is 100% (as far as POSIX is concerned) portable and valid as long as the write was not being performed by an async-signal-unsafe function. –  R.. Nov 29 '11 at 23:39
1  
@R..: as usual with "pseudo-advice": once you understand when it's safe to ignore, you can safely ignore it ;-) In any event, you must terminate the program eventually; you cannot recover from the signal. –  Kerrek SB Nov 29 '11 at 23:40
add comment

"I cannot figure out why fflush (stdout) is called here in this code I try to comment this line and behavior was exactly the same."

Because you're not guaranteed to see previous printf() output if that output doesn't end in a newline.

Basically, you only need it if you're displaying say a prompt without a newline, and you want to make sure the user can see it.

See this site.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.