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Well, I'm learning C++ and never really learned how to do stuff that is not OO. I'm trying to get a bit more experience coding in C style.

GobalInformation.h

#pragma once

#ifndef GLOBALINFORMATION_H
#define GLOBALINFORMATION_H

#include "MapInformation.h"

namespace gi {
    MapInformation mapInf;
};

#endif

I would like to be able to access gi::mapInf from every header and cpp in my project. Right now I'm including globalinformation.h in every header, so I'm getting linker errors with multiple definitions.

How can I work around the problem?

share|improve this question
3  
You may think now that you want this global variable, but I assure you will regret it. – Björn Pollex Nov 29 '11 at 20:12
1  
@BjörnPollex elaborate please – xcrypt Nov 29 '11 at 20:14
    
OT: Why do you use #pragma once and header guards (BTW, without unique identifiers => dangerous)? – Andre Nov 29 '11 at 20:28
    
@Andre Hmm, I read it at wikipedia once it might be good to do it : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pragma_once – xcrypt Nov 29 '11 at 20:32
1  
@xcrypt: When using header guards you should append a unique part to avoid name clashes. You could add a GUID like so: #ifndef GLOBALINFORMATION_H_8FF7B23E1B4D11E18852C5D64824019B, #define GLOBALINFORMATION_H_8FF7B23E1B4D11E18852C5D64824019B. If you don't need portability I would recommend to only use #pragma once if your compiler supports it. – Andre Nov 30 '11 at 12:22
up vote 14 down vote accepted

In header file only do

namespace gi {
    extern MapInformation mapInf;
};

In CPP file provide the actual definition.

namespace gi {
    MapInformation mapInf;
};

It will work as you intend.

If you are using the MapInformation across dynamic link library boundaries you might have to link against the library that includes the definition cpp file. Also on Window you might have to use dllimport/dllexport

share|improve this answer
1  
Note that the definition must be in exactly one translation-unit. – Björn Pollex Nov 29 '11 at 20:10
    
in globalinformation.cpp I should do "MapInformation mapInf;"? – xcrypt Nov 29 '11 at 20:12
1  
@xcrypt .. I have updated my answer to reflect what to do in CPP file – parapura rajkumar Nov 29 '11 at 20:13

Be aware that having globals in multiple compilation units can easily lead to order-of-initialization problems. You may wish to consider replacing each global with a function that returns a reference. In your case, put this in one cpp file and declare it in the header:

namespace gi {
    MapInformation& getMapInf()
    {
        static MapInformation result;
        return result;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Could you perhaps explain what is the cause of this order-of-intialization problem in your answer? – xcrypt Nov 29 '11 at 20:26
4  
@xcrypt: The order in which global objects are initialized is unspecified (across TUs), so if you have one global object that requires another one, you can't be certain that they'll be initialized in the correct order. Having a local static object (which is essentially also global, just with restricted visibility) avoids this because you are guaranteed that the object will have been constructed by the time getMapInf() returns. – Kerrek SB Nov 29 '11 at 20:59
    
I suppose this function should be inlined or declared extern? Well, I had to, anyway – xcrypt Nov 29 '11 at 21:46

Global variables are C, but namespaces are C++. There is a good discussion on using global variables and how they can be replaced by Singleton pattern: Globals and Singletons

And here is a simple sample: CPP/Classes/Singleton

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Perhaps a better solution is to create a global object that contains all your global data. Then pass a smart pointer to the classes that actually need to access this shared global data. Example:

class GlobalData
{
public:
    int ticks_;
};   


//Other file
class ThatNeedsGlobalData
{
public:
ThatNeedsGlobalData(std::shared_ptr<GlobalData> globalData);
};

This will save you some trouble.

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
That would also be a possible solution, so I will vote up. But one of the reason I want it as global is to prevent each class from having a reference to the information (saving memory). It might not matter much in the end, but hey, I think it's cool :p – xcrypt Nov 29 '11 at 20:29
    
So you want to save the size of a pointer/smart pointer in each class that needs access to the global data? Ok. Just try it and see if you think it is worth it. You can always try other solutions later. – mantler Nov 29 '11 at 20:35
    
exactly, hehe ^.^ – xcrypt Nov 29 '11 at 20:40

Here are a few things that you need to take care of while trying to use global variables the way you have used.

  1. Ensure that all the header files that the header files that GobalInformation.h includes are also enclosed insides #ifndefs. (I could not see mapinformation.h so I assume you have done it)

  2. Just like CPP, C compiler also does not ensure order of the initialization of variables in different translation units(different C/CPP files). Hence declare the header file as

    //GlobalInformation.h
    
    namespace gi {
        extern MapInformation mapInf;
    };
    
  3. In a function that you know would be called first initialize the variable. This way lazy-initialization can also be acheived in C.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure what you mean with [2], please elaborate? Seems important – xcrypt Nov 29 '11 at 20:57

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