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I wanted to demonstrate the usefulness of decorators in python to some people and failed at a simple example: Consider two functions (for sake of simplicity without arguments) f and g. One can define their sum f+g as the function that returns f() + g(). Of course adding, subtracting etc. of functions is not defined in general. But it is easy to write a decorator that transforms every function into an addable function.

Now I would like to have a decorator that transforms any function into an "operable" function, that is, a function that behaves in the described way for any operator in the standard module operator. My implementation looks as follows:

import operator

class function(object):
    def __init__(self, f):
        self.f = f
    def __call__(self):
        return self.f()

def op_to_function_op(op):
    def function_op(self, operand):
        def f():
            return op(self(), operand())
        return function(f)
    return function_op
binary_op_names = ['__add__', '__and__', '__div__', '__eq__', '__floordiv__', '__ge__', '__gt__', '__le__', '__lt__', '__mod__', '__mul__', '__ne__', '__or__', '__pow__', '__sub__', '__truediv__', '__xor__']
for name in binary_op_names:
    type.__setattr__(function, name, op_to_function_op(getattr(operator, name)))

Let's perform a little test to see if it works:

@function
def a():
    return 4

def b():
    return 7

c = a + b
print c()
print c() == operator.__add__(4, 7)

Output:

11
True

This is the final version I got after some experimenting. Now let's do two small, irrelevant modifications to have a look what I tried before:

First: In the definition of binary_op_names, change the square brackets to round brackets. Suddenly, a (for me) completely unrelated error message comes out:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "example.py", line 30, in <module>
    c = a + b
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for +: 'function' and 'function'

Where does this come from??

Second: Write op_to_function_op as a lambda expression:

op = getattr(operator, name)
type.__setattr__(function, name, lambda self, other: function(lambda: op(self(), other())))

Perform a slightly more involved test case:

@function
def a():
    return 4

def b():
    return 7

c = a + b
print c()
print c() == operator.__add__(4, 7)
print c() == operator.__xor__(4, 7)

Output:

3
False
True

This looks to me like scope leakage, but again I don't understand why this happens.

share|improve this question
    
type.__setattr__ seems to do something evil .. don't know what. The list to tuple thing is really strange. If you change type.__setattr__ to setattr everything seems to work. –  mkorpela Nov 29 '11 at 20:51
    
The typical memoize decorator applied to the fibonacci sequence and other cache-friendly problems might be a better application to demonstrate decorators. –  Daenyth Nov 29 '11 at 20:56
    
The tuple issue seems to be a heinous bug. I'm seeing the same behavior. Absolutely everything about name checks out, but type.__setattr__ fails to work. –  Nate Nov 29 '11 at 21:09
    
Yes, the strange question actually is why type.__setattr__ actually works. I can't remember why I used it. –  Turion Nov 29 '11 at 21:45
    
@Daenyth, thank for an unhelpful comment ;) I actually did demonstrate memoize right before I tried to implement this. –  Turion Nov 29 '11 at 21:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For the first issue, I didn't see any problems when changing binary_op_names from a list to a tuple, not sure why you were seeing that.

As for the second issue, all operations will perform an XOR because __xor__ was the last item that op was set to. Because op is not passed into the lambda when it is created, each time the lambda is called it will look for op in a global scope and always see __xor__.

You can prevent this by creating a lambda that acts as a closure, similar to your current op_tofunction_op, it might end up looking something like this:

op_to_function_op = lambda f: lambda self, other: function(lambda: f(self(), other()))
for name in binary_op_names:
    op = getattr(operator, name)
    type.__setattr__(function, name, op_to_function_op(op))

>>> (function(lambda: 4) + (lambda: 7))()
11
>>> (function(lambda: 4) - (lambda: 7))()
-3
>>> (function(lambda: 4) ^ (lambda: 7))()
3
share|improve this answer
    
Did you use type.__setattr__ or setattr? (See discussion in the main comment thread) Thanks for the clarification on the lambdas! –  Turion Nov 29 '11 at 21:48
    
I used type.__setattr__ and it seemed to work, but I don't use setattr or type.__setattr__ much so I can't really comment much on which is preferable. –  Andrew Clark Nov 29 '11 at 21:54

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