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I have a string that is passed by parameter and I have to replace all occurrences of it in another string, ex:

function r(text, oldChar, newChar)
{
    return text.replace(oldChar, newChar); // , "g")
}

The characters passed could be any character, including ^, |, $, [, ], (, )...

Is there a method to replace, for example, all ^ from the string I ^like^ potatoes with $?

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Doesn't your function already do that? –  Tom van der Woerdt Nov 29 '11 at 20:32
    
@TomvanderWoerdt No, JavaScript's String.prototype.replace only replaces the first occurrence of strings; you need to use a regular expression with the global flag if you want global replacement. –  Phrogz Nov 29 '11 at 20:36
    
I stand corrected :-) –  Tom van der Woerdt Nov 29 '11 at 20:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted
function r(t, o, n) {
    return t.split(o).join(n);
}
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If you simply pass '^' to the JavaScript replace function it should be treated as a string and not as a regular expression. However, using this method, it will only replace the first character. A simple solution would be:

function r(text, oldChar, newChar)
{
    var replacedText = text;

    while(text.indexOf(oldChar) > -1)
    {
        replacedText = replacedText.replace(oldChar, newChar);
    }

    return replacedText;
}
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Use a RegExp object instead of a simple string:

text.replace(new RegExp(oldChar, 'g'), newChar);
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1  
Fails for: var text = "^xxx^"; text.replace(new RegExp("^", 'g'), "$"); –  BrunoLM Nov 29 '11 at 20:34
    
Note that you'll need to escape the character in case it's a special regex char, e.g. "\", ".", "(", etc. Thus new RegExp("\\"+oldChar,"g") –  Phrogz Nov 29 '11 at 20:34
    
@Phrogz that requires a list of all possible escaping sequences as I don't know what is coming on the parameter –  BrunoLM Nov 29 '11 at 20:35
    
You would have to escape the ^ with two backslashes to make it work: var text = "^xxx^"; text.replace(new RegExp("\\^", 'g'), "$"); –  aefxx Nov 29 '11 at 20:36
1  
@BrunoLM You are right; while JS will allow /\z/ and treat it the same as /z/, there are a few broken cases such as /\x/ being treated as an empty hexadecimal character instead of just an /x/. –  Phrogz Nov 29 '11 at 21:31

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