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class A
{
 class B;
 B::data myData; //Error: incomplete type not allowed.

    class B
    {
    public:
        struct data
        {
        int number;
        };
    };
};

In the code above, how could I declare a member variable of type data in class A?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

B must be defined before you use it in the declaration of A::myData:

class A
{
    class B
    {
    public:
        struct data
        {
            int number;
        };
    };

     B::data myData;
};
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Okay. I thought there might be a way to let the compiler know that B::data is a struct before actually defining it, similar to declaring class B; –  user974967 Nov 29 '11 at 21:51
    
Even if you could, you still wouldn't be able to use it to define a data member: the type has to be complete. –  James McNellis Nov 29 '11 at 21:53
    
James is correct, the only way you can use a type before it is fully defined is as a pointer, because pointers take up constant space –  Dan F Nov 29 '11 at 22:02
    
@DanF: Or in a reference type, or as a parameter or return type in a function declaration, or as a template parameter, or... there are lots of scenarios in which incomplete types are usable. –  James McNellis Nov 29 '11 at 22:31
    
I didn't know you could use incomplete types as return types, parameter types, or template parameters. The more you know! –  Dan F Nov 30 '11 at 14:23

I think all you need to do is put the class definition in front of the declaration of the variable. The compiler has no idea what is inside class B, only that it exists, until it encounters the actual definition of the class

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Use scope specifiers and make sure you don't use the type until after its defined in the file:

class A
{   
    class B
    {
    public:
        struct data
        {
        int number;
        };
    };

    B::data myData;
};

Also, note that forward-declaration doesn't work unless you're just using a pointer to the class. When you create an instance of the class like you have, it needs the definition to that class available to it immediately.

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