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window.onload = ->

  boxOrig1 = 10
  boxOrig2 = 30
  canvasW = 400
  canvasH = 300

  ctx = $("#canvas")[0].getContext('2d');

  draw = (origin,dimension) ->    
    ctx.clearRect(0, 0, canvasW, canvasH)
    ctx.fillStyle = 'rgb(200,0,0)'  
    ctx.fillRect(origin + boxOrig1, boxOrig1, dimension, dimension)  
    ctx.fillStyle = 'rgba(0, 0, 200, 0.5)'  
    ctx.fillRect(origin + boxOrig2, boxOrig2, dimension, dimension)

  for m in [10..100] by 10
    t = setTimeout (-> draw(m, 150)), 1000 
    t.clearTimeout
#     draw(m,150)
#     alert m

As an exercise, the code above is meant to draw a little design on a canvas, pause for a second, then redraw it again 10 pixels to the right.

I can see that the mechanics work fine when I interrupt the loop with an alert (as in those last two commented lines), but I'm not getting the expected behavior with the setTimeout function. The design just appears at the rightmost position after the timeout, skipping the incremental steps in between.

I've tried many different ways of doing this from other examples, but it's just melting my brain. Any suggestions?

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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Geoff has outlined one approach (using setInterval and clearing it from the callback), so I'll outline the other: Using setTimeout from the callback. Something like

m = 10
do drawCallback = ->
  draw m, 150
  m += 10
  setTimeout drawCallback, 1000 unless m > 100

Note that there is a subtle timing difference between the two approaches that you should be aware of: setInterval func, 1000 will run the function once every 1000ms; the chained setTimeout will put a 1000ms delay between each function call. So if draw took 100ms, say, the chained setTimeout would be equivalent to setInterval func, 1100. It probably doesn't matter, but it's worth being aware of.

Bonus approach: You don't have to abandon your loop; you could just set all the timeouts from it at once:

for m in [10..100] by 10
  do (m) ->
    setTimeout (-> draw(m, 150)), 100 * m

The do (m) is necessary so that the closure passed to setTimeout sees each value of m, not just its final value in the loop. See my article A CoffeeScript Intervention for more info on this.

Finally: I know this all seems very confusing at first, but timing in JS is actually very simple because the language is single-threaded. That means that events you schedule with setTimeout or setInterval or any other async function will never occur during a loop, even if the loop is infinite. They only occur after all of your code has finished executing. I talk about this in a little more detail in my book on CoffeeScript.

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They key concept I was missing was the passing of the closure via the "do" keyword. As we Perlers like to say, TMTOWTDI. Thanks all! Now back to practicing :-) –  user105090 Nov 30 '11 at 4:38
    
Outstanding explanation. –  Geoff Moller Nov 30 '11 at 5:51
    
this answer came in handy, nice one Trevor twitter.com/#!/karlseguin/status/165442250376085504 –  Mark Essel Feb 3 '12 at 14:41
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This might be expressed more intuitively as a setInterval:

window.onload = ->

  boxOrig1 = 10
  boxOrig2 = 30
  canvasW = 400 
  canvasH = 300 

  ctx = document.getElementById("canvas").getContext('2d')

  draw = (origin,dimension) ->
    ctx.clearRect(0, 0, canvasW, canvasH)
    ctx.fillStyle = 'rgb(200,0,0)'
    ctx.fillRect(origin + boxOrig1, boxOrig1, dimension, dimension)
    ctx.fillStyle = 'rgba(0, 0, 200, 0.5)'
    ctx.fillRect(origin + boxOrig2, boxOrig2, dimension, dimension)

  count = 10
  timer = setInterval (-> 
    if count == 100
        clearInterval(timer)
    draw(count, 150); count+=10
  ), 1000
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