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I load a .csv file that fill my struct

typedef struct list TList;
    struct list {
        int index;
        char data;
        TList* prox;
    };

How can I do a bubble sort in my list ?

I tried the follow

void bubble(TList *list, int siz) {
    int c = 0;
    int x, y, temp;

    for (x = (siz - 1); x >= 0; x--) {
        c++;
        for (y = 1; y <= x; y++) {
            c++;
            if (list->index[y - 1] > list->index[y]) {
                temp = list->index[y - 1];
                list->index[y - 1] = list->index[y];
                list->index[y] = temp;
            }
        }
    }
    printf("\nNeeded Steps: %i\n", c);
}

I think this is because the list->index[y]. It's like a table in a database... at position 0 (index), I have the data, and the pointer to the next node. With list->index[..] I want to pass the position and get that node, like an array. It is a linked-list and prox needs to point to the next node. I filled my list with the data that came from a .csv file, and the list->prox points to the next node.

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1  
list->index[...] makes no sense. index is an int, not an array. What are you attempting to do here? –  Mooing Duck Nov 30 '11 at 0:00
1  
what does index[y - 1] mean, when index is declared as int? –  littleadv Nov 30 '11 at 0:01
    
No...i think this is because the list->index[y]. –  Lucas_Santos Nov 30 '11 at 0:01
    
What happened? What did you expect to happen? Is this a home-rolled linked-list? Is this C++ or C (looks like C to me)? Please put as much information as possible in the question. –  Mooing Duck Nov 30 '11 at 0:02
    
It's like a table in a database...at position 0 (index), I have the data, and the pointer to the next register –  Lucas_Santos Nov 30 '11 at 0:02
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

STL provides nice built-in sort algorithm. check http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/

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But this is for C++ ? –  Lucas_Santos Nov 30 '11 at 0:12
    
Yes, that's part of the C++ standard library –  Mooing Duck Nov 30 '11 at 0:12
    
Ok, but how can I do to pass a list ? –  Lucas_Santos Nov 30 '11 at 0:15
    
If what you want to do is sort numbers in the file. Parse out numbers and store them in a vector, over which call STL sort. I think you can get what you want. –  Wangge Nov 30 '11 at 2:28
add comment
typedef struct list TList;
struct list {
    int index;
    char data;
    TList* prox;

    //give the list an [] like an array
    char& operator[](int index) {
        TList* cur = this;
        while(cur->index != index) {
            if (cur->prox == NULL)
                throw std::exception("INVALID INDEX");
            cur = cur->prox;
        }
        return cur->data;
    }
};

This will let you use the index operator on your linked list kinda like an array.

        if ((*list)[y - 1] > (*list)[y]) {
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I will try it now –  Lucas_Santos Nov 30 '11 at 0:48
    
Which include I have to do to implements that? –  Lucas_Santos Nov 30 '11 at 0:52
    
did you copy-paste? –  Mooing Duck Nov 30 '11 at 2:33
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Your inner if is incorrect (both the if conditional as well as the the swap). You want to swap the entire TList, not just the indexes of each TList. For example, if you have two TLists like this:

TList[0]       TList[1]
Index1         Index0
"Data for 1"   "Data for 0"  

after swapping, you want

TList[0]       TList[1]
Index0         Index1
"Data for 0"   "Data for 1"

Instead, your inner loop does this:

TList[0]       TList[1]
Index0         Index1
"Data for 1"   "Data for 0"

But it doesnt do this actually, because your if conditional doesn't work as Mooing Duck pointed out in the comments. Hint: You don't want to change anything in any of the TLists, you just want to change where they are relative to each other.

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yes, i just wanna put in order. Is a bubble sort –  Lucas_Santos Nov 30 '11 at 0:13
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Why oh why would you want to use a bubble sort? It's the classic example of an algorithm that's essentially always the wrong choice!

If you're doing this in real code, just use a standard collection (std::list if you insist on a linked list, probably std::vector if you're being sane), and then use std::sort to do the sorting.

If you're doing this for something like homework, and really must use your own list structure and a horrible algorithm, then you'd implement your iteration and comparison using pointers instead of subscripts, so your comparison would be something like

if (pos->index > pos->next->index)
    /* swap items */

You'll (probably) also want to base at least your inner loop on pointer operations instead of integers and indexing -- its increment operation will probably be something like pos=pos->next.

Also note that with a singly linked list, it's difficult to do a swap involving the current node, so you frequently want to consider the next node and the one after that (at least when you can -- I.e., not dealing with the first node).

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