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In C, you can define structures to hold an assortment of variables;

typedef struct {
    float       sp;
    float       K;                 // interactive form - for display only
    float       Ti;                //  values are based in seconds
    float       Td;
} pid_data_t;

But lets say that K, Ti, and Td should never be set publicly, and should only be used for storing the values after they have been manipulated. So, I want these values not to be updated by;

pid_data_t = pid_data;
pid_data.K = 10;         // no good! changing K should be done via a function

I want them to be set via a function;

int8_t pid_set_pid_params(float new_K_dash, float new_Ti_dash, 
    float new_Td_dash)
{
    …                             // perform lots of things
    pid_data->K  = new_K_dash;
    pid_data->Ti = new_Ti_dash;
    pid_data->Td = new_Td_dash;
}

Any thoughts on this? I know C++ uses like a get/set property, but was wondering what people might do on C.

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If the client of your API knows the layout of your structure, you can't really prevent him from changing it. What you can do is what the answers describe, hide the private parts of your structure from your APIs interface. –  millimoose Nov 30 '11 at 0:33
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your public interface should only offer an opaque pointer (maybe DATA*, or data_handle), as well as handler functions create_data(), set_data_value(), read_data_value(), free_data(), etc., which operate on the opaque pointer.

Much like FILE*.

Just don't give your clients the internal header files :-)

// library.h

typedef struct data_t * data_handle;

data_handle create_data();
void        free_data(data_handle);

Private implementation (don't ship):

#include "library.h"

struct data_t
{
  /* ... */
};

data_handle create_data() { return malloc(sizeof(struct data_t)); }
void        free_data(data_handle h) { free(h); }
/* etc. etc. */
share|improve this answer
    
typedef struct data_t *data_handle! –  Cat Plus Plus Nov 30 '11 at 0:23
    
@CatPlusPlus: yes yes yes... –  Kerrek SB Nov 30 '11 at 0:25
    
@KerrekSB Thanks! I think I understand this - I'm fairly new to all this. So in the main c code, I would create a new instantiation by calling data_t new_data1 and if i wanted another data_t new_data2? And in all the handler functions, I would have to have data_handle h? So, set_data(data_handle h, uint8_t new_K) and in the main c code, call set_data(new_data1, 10)? –  mriksman Nov 30 '11 at 0:39
    
@mriksman: No, in the client C code you would only use data_handle: data_handle h = create_data(); etc. You access everything via suitable accessor functions, which all operate on data_handles. –  Kerrek SB Nov 30 '11 at 0:44
    
@KerrekSB Thanks :) So in your example h is essentially what I was referring to as new_data1; I can create a h1, and a h2 etc. I'll give it a shot tonight, and read up on what this malloc and free() is about too! –  mriksman Nov 30 '11 at 0:52
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The canonical way to do this is by using a combination of opaque pointers and public structs, along with allocators, getters and setters for the private elements. About along these lines:

foo.h

typedef struct Foo {
    /* public elements */
} Foo;

Foo *new_Foo(void);
void Foo_something_opaque(Foo* foo);

foo.c

#include "foo.h"

typedef struct Private_Foo_ {
    struct Foo foo;
    /* private elements */
} Private_Foo_;

Foo *new_Foo(void)
{
    Private_Foo_ *foo = malloc(sizeof(Private_Foo_));
    /* initialize private and public elements */
    return (Foo*) foo;
}

void Foo_something_opaque(Foo *foo)
{
    Private_Foo_ *priv_foo = (Private_Foo_*) foo;
    /* do something */
}

This woks, because C guarantees, that the address of a struct variable always is equal to the address of the very first struct element. We can use this to have a Private_Foo_ struct, containing a public Foo at the beginning, giving out pointers to the whole thing, with the compilation units not having access to the Private_Foo_ struct defintion just seeing some memory without any context.

It should be noted that C++ works quite similar behind the curtains.

Update

As KereekSB pointed out, this will break if used in a array.

I say: Then don't make Foo f[], however tempting, but make an arrays of pointers to Foo: Foo *f[].

If one really insists on using it in arrays do the following:

foo_private.h

typedef struct Private_Foo_ {
    /* private elements */
} Private_Foo_;

static size_t Private_Foo_sizeof(void) { return sizeof(Private_Foo_); }

foo_private.h is written in a way, that it can be compiled into an object file. Use some helper program to link it and use the result of Private_Foo_sizeof() to generate the actual, plattform dependent foo.h from some foo.h.in file.

foo.h

#include

#define FOO_SIZEOF_PRIVATE_ELEMENTS <generated by preconfigure step>

typedef struct Foo_ {
    /* public elements */
    char reserved[FOO_SIZEOF_PRIVATE_ELEMENTS];
} Foo;

Foo *new_Foo(void);
void Foo_something_opaque(Foo* foo);

foo.c

#include "foo.h"
#include "foo_private.h"

Foo *new_Foo(void)
{
    Foo *foo = malloc(sizeof(Foo));
    /* initialize private and public elements */
    return (Foo*) foo;
}

void Foo_something_opaque(Foo *foo)
{
    Private_Foo_ *priv_foo = (Private_Foo_*) foo.reserved;
    /* do something */
}

IMHO this is really messy. Now I'm a fan of smart containers (unfortunately there's no standard container library for C). Anyway: In such a container is creates through a function like

Array *array_alloc(size_t sizeofElement, unsigned int elements);
void *array_at(Array *array, unsigned int index);
/* and all the other functions expected of arrays */

See the libowfaw for an example of such an implementation. Now for the type Foo it was trivial to provide a function

Array *Foo_array(unsigned int count);
share|improve this answer
    
All names starting with "double-underscore-letter" are reserved. –  Kerrek SB Nov 30 '11 at 0:29
    
@KerrekSB: Right... fixed it to single underscores at the and which should be fine. Those idenfiers are not exported from the compilation unit as well (at least they should not be). –  datenwolf Nov 30 '11 at 0:30
    
Unfortunately, all names beginning with "underscore-capital" are also reserved! :-) –  Kerrek SB Nov 30 '11 at 0:34
    
@KerrekSB: Yes, I figured that just now too. Well underscores stand out, and those private members should stand out, so that they are not exposed accidentally, i.e. functions being declared static. –  datenwolf Nov 30 '11 at 0:36
    
What's to clash? Supposedly you're not shipping the private header to the client, non? It'll only be used within the library. –  Kerrek SB Nov 30 '11 at 0:38
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in C, by convention....

for OO C like this...

I'd have a pid_data_create(&data) // initializes your struct

and pid_data_set_proportional_gain(&data, 0.1);

etc...

so basically achieving a C++ ish class... prefix all functions with the "class" / "struct" name and always pass the struct * as the first parameter.

also, it should store function pointers for polymorphisim, and you shouldn't call those function pointers directly, again, have a function that takes your struct as a parameter, and then the can make the function pointer call (can check for nulls, fake inheritance/virtual functions, and other stuff)

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Object orientation is a way of thinking and modelling, data encapsulation where struct data should not be modified directly by the user can be implemented this way:

my_library.h

#ifndef __MY_LIBRARY__
#define __MY_LIBRARY__
typedef void MiObject;

MyObject* newMyObject();

void destroyMyObject(MyObject*)

int setMyObjectProperty1(MyObject*,someDataType1*);

/*Return a pointer to the data/object,  classic pass by value */
someDataType1* getMyObjectProperty2Style1(MyObject*);

int setMyObjectProperty2(MyObject*,someDataType2*);

/* The data/object is passed through reference */
int getMyObjectProperty2Style2(MyObject*,someDataType2**);

    /* Some more functions here */
#endif

my_library.c

struct _MyHiddenDataType{
    int a;
    char* b;
    ..
    ..
};

MyObject* newMyObject(){
struct _MyHiddenData* newData = (struct _MyHiddenData*)malloc(sizeof(struct _MyHiddenData);
//check null, etc
//initialize data, etc
return (MyObject*)newData;
}

int setMyObjectProperty1(MyObject* object,someDataType1* somedata){
    struct _MyHiddenData* data = (struct _MyHiddenData*)object;
    //check for nulls, and process somedata
    data->somePropery=somedata;
}

someDataType1* getMyObjectProperty2Style1(MyObject*){
    struct _MyHiddenData* data = (struct _MyHiddenData*)object;
    //check for nulls, and process somedata
    return data->someProperty;
}
/* Similar code for the rest */

And this way you have encapsulated the struct properties as if they were private. On the same manner static functions inside my_libray.c would behave as private functions. Get a good look at C and you'll see, that your imagination is the limit to what you can do.

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